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Old 02-07-2013, 10:39 PM   #21
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Hall Chart

After the last class of inductees, the GC average held steady and is now a 4.02. I would expect a large class to bring down the average, but this was not the case. With 11 entrants coming in the next class, we will see if the GC stays constant, or does come down. I have not had to go to the leader boards for any induction. It is too early to tell, but I think having 30 teams' worth of players allows for a sufficient number of qualifying entries without having to go "off the board to the boards."

We have approximately 1/8th of the Hall filled. 6 inductees are from the previous Hall. I didn't put any thought into a target number for repeat entries, prior to the start. But if this rate holds up, we should have about 50 at the end of the run.

If 50 is a good number for repeat entries, then I expect to see about 20 players in both HOFs that are RL HOFers. This is a bit of a SWAG. The entrants in each Hall are not completely independent of each other, as far as the probability of their entrances is concerned. RL HOFers are more likely to put up HOF numbers than those that are not RL HOFers, generally. So, my SWAG is 20.

On the chart we see the floor still at 3 and lots of plots along the 4 line. I think this is a result of the updated modifiers that actually work from a 4.0 expected mean. Still looking for that first "Once in a Generation" career.

Fred Carroll as the 6th plot and Tony Campama as the 24th plot, in conjunction, represent the current median score.
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Old 02-08-2013, 11:01 AM   #22
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Class of 2018 (1946) Hitters, Part1: Simmons, Votto, Horner

5 hitters and 6 pitchers enter in this largest of classes. I am considering Clark Griffith as a player induction in RL as opposed to a Pioneer/Executive.

-------------------------------------

Ted Simmons is the 7th repeat player to enter this HOF.

Taken by the Cardinals as the 7th player overall in the 1991 draft, Simmons appeared in seven All Star games and won a GG at C before retiring in 2010.

He enters the Hall as the player with the highest batting average, .313, OPS, .928, runs, 1342, TB, 4259, doubles, 516, RBI, 1483, VORP and WAR while playing as a catcher.

He also has the highest single season marks for Cs in : BA (.371), SLG (.705), OPS (1.140), VORP, runs (144), hits (234), TB (422), and WAR.

For his entire career, he collected 2598 hits (14th), scored 1414 runs (22nd), knocked 442 HRs (28th), and drove in 1584 (13th). His 550 career doubles places him 11th All-Time.

He broke into the league as a 17 year-old, and hit .314 with 19 HRs and a npa OPS+ of 150.

His finest season with the bat was in 1997 when he slashed 371/436/705 for a npa OPS+ of 199. This was the second of three consecutive seasons in which he hit over .350 (though in one he only played 93 games). In his 1997 season, he hit 46 HRs with 146 RBI and scored 138 times. From 1995-1997 he had a minimum of 222 hits in each season.

In 2002 he hit a career high 57 HRs to lead the league.

In 29 post season games over 6 seasons, Simmons hit 11 HRs in 118 ABs and slashed 347/422/703. In spite of his contributions, he never appeared in a WS.

Simmons enters the Hall with the highest HOFs score of any inductee. His HOFm number also exceeds the Hall Average.

Black Ink: 19 (0)
Gray Ink: 122 (95)
HOFm: 268.5 (124)
HOFs: 74 (44)

Gorilla Composite: 4.8 (2.3)

--------------------------------------

Joey Votto was taken by the Indians with the 11th overall pick in 1994. He played his entire career in Cleveland, that is until the Indians traded him, for some reason, to Milwaukee, for Don Zimmer, in July of 2012. That was to be his final season.

As a rookie, he hit .314 with 42 HRs and drove in 135 while scoring 126. He led the league in walks with 126. In an amazing display of quickly earned respect, Votto also given a league high 18 IBBs as a rookie. He slashed 314/427/590 for an OPS+ of 171 as he led Cleveland to the Promised Land (not literally, because the franchise did not relocate) and a World Series title. Votto hit 8 HRs in 57 ABs in that post season.

Votto helped bring Cleveland 3 WS titles during his tenure.

In career post season play, Votto hit 23 HRs in 256 ABs and slashed 328/422/688.

For his regular season career, Votto collected 2715 hits (8th), 548 HRs (11th), 1761 RBI (8th), 1606 runs scored (6th), and 565 doubles (7th).

Votto played in 6 ASGs. He hit 40+ HRs 4 times. He had a career high 53 HRs in 1999.

Votto enters with Gray Ink, HOFm, and HOFs numbers exceeding the Hall averages.

Black Ink: 7
Gray Ink: 170
HOFm 183.5
HOFs: 61

Gorilla Composite: 3.8

------------------------

Bob Horner, tabbed as the funniest man in the history of the planet, adds a ray of sunshine to the Hall...though it may be a bit off-color....

The fifth player taken in the 1982 draft (Oakland), Horner led the league in GS 4 times between 184 and 1988. Then the injuries found him here, as they did in RL.

He hit 300 HRs in his first 6 seasons. He broke the 60 mark twice as he led the league in HRs 3 times, and led in TB 4 times.

In 1986 he hit 62 HRs and had 146 RBI and won the league MVP. He followed that up with a 65 HR/ 151 RBI season and slashed 301/349/662 (career highs in BA and slg) for a npa OPS+ of 168. Yes, this was 1987, but he was still playing home games in Oakland.

He made one post season appearance, in 1988, but his A's lost to the Red Sox. Horner hit .321 for the series with a HR.

Of his 1503 career hits, 403 of them were HRs. He drove in 1129 while posting a career slash line of 269/326/523 (npa OPS+ 134).

A 5 time All-Star, Horner enters with a Black Ink total above the Hall average.

Black Ink: 31
Gray Ink: 92
HOFm: 128.5
HOFs: 21

Gorilla Composite: 3.1

Last edited by VanillaGorilla; 02-20-2013 at 06:22 PM.
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Old 02-08-2013, 05:33 PM   #23
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Class of 2018 (1946) Hitters, Part 2: Alyea, Dunn

Brant Alyea is the first surprise inductee as far as being one of those guys that I didn't think had a chance when I started going over his profile. I don't assume a player will notmake it. I tabulate all need numbers and then compare them to the current standards. 99% of the time I know who isn't going in when I start. Alyea is a one-percenter.

Brant Alyea was the 11th player selected in the 1990 draft (San Diego).

He did not sign with the Padres, and the next year he was taken in the second rd (after the supplemental first rd) by the Brewers with the 81st pick overall. I don't know how much less the $333,000 signing bonus was than the San Diego offer the year before, but it was surely significant.

Grabbing what would prove to be an immense bargain, the Brewers kept Alyea in Milwaukee for the duration of his career, which ended after the 2003 season.

During his career, Alyea collected 1292 hits and hit 321 HRs. You see the makings of my surprise, here. His career slash line is 290/370/556 for a vary Hall-worthy npa OPS+ of 148. But with a career that only consisted of 1336 games, I didn't think he would have the totals to get in on the Veteran Standard, let alone the standard standard.

However, Alyea had an outstanding start to his career. His first seven seasons he only once posted a npa OPS+ below 145. He led the league in HRs twice, RBI twice, and hits once.

In 1995 he led the league in HRs, RBI, R, H, RC, WAR, and other categories as he took MVP honors. He hit 63 HRs, drove in 169 RBI, and collected 215 hits and scored 131 times...all league bests. He slashed 342/432/700 for a npa OPS+ of 197.

Injuries were not a constant, yet, for Alyea. In 1996 he again played 162 games (the 4th time in his career to do so) and drove in 171 runs on 48 HRs and a .308 batting average. After that season, he never managed to play in 120 games, again.

Alyea had won the ROY on a 45 HR season. He appeared in 3 AS games in his career. He never made it to a WS, but he is remembered as a great in Milwaukee, and now is inducted into the tractor shed in Dyersville.

Alyea gets in by virtue of his Black Ink being above the Hall average.

Black Ink: 25
Gray Ink: 80
HOFm: 84
HOFs: 35

Gorilla Composite: 2.8

---------------------------

Adam Dunn was no surprise. The only slight surprise was that he didn't get in on the First Ballot screening. He breezes into the Hall with some very Dunnesque numbers, and some not so Dunnesque.

Dunn was drafted by the Rangers with the 25th overall pick in the 1995 draft. He retired following the 2011 season. In his first 7 seasons, he hit 44 or more HRs in each season (the other, he hit 36) and both scored and drove in 100 or more runs in each of those seasons.

In 2001, he hit a career high 68 HRs while batting .311 (!!). Dunn, in a shocker of shockers, hit .300 4 times in his career, here. He led the Rangers to a WS win as he posted his 4th straight 60 HR season (he hit 59 in 1997...one more there would have made it 6 straight seasons).

In 1998 he won the league MVP with a 63 HR campaign that saw him hit a career high average of .326. This was also good for a batting title. Yep, that's right...Adam Dunn batting champion. His OBP of 436 and his slg% of .725 were also league bests. This made for a npa OPS+ of 207.

Dunn won 4 HR titles and appeared in 5 AS games. His career slash line of 284/406/615 is a HOF elite npa OPS+ of 169.

His .615 career slg% is currently 4th All-Time. Only Dutch Zwilling, the leader, is a HOF eligible player with a higher career slg %. His 545 career HRs places him 12th on the All Time list, sandwiched between Joey Votto and Fred McGriff.

He drove in 1387 runs (30th) and scored 1217 times (48th). In a semi shock, his 1434 career strikeouts has him 57th on that list. He had 1621 hits, which means almost 34% of his base hits were HRs.

Dunn enters the HOF with Black Ink and HOFm scores above the Hall average.

Black Ink: 51 (4)
Gray Ink: 119 (79)
HOFm: 181 (73)
HOFs: 44 (30)

Gorilla Composite: 4.8 (1.8)
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Old 02-10-2013, 09:49 AM   #24
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Class of 2018 (1946) Pitchers, Part 1: Carlton, Moore, Pascual

The pitchers take longer to screen than the hitters, so I was somewhat dreading this class, because of that. I have the first half of the 1946 pitching class having gone through about 1/3 of the eligible pitchers.

--------------------------------

Steve Carlton was the 12th player selected overall in the 1987 draft (Rangers). He finished his career in 2009 and enters the Hall as the pitcher with the second most wins (293) and second most strikeouts (4221) in league history.

Carlton posted a career record of 293-216 and an OOTP ERA of 3.46 (npa ERA+ 127).

Carlton was an 8 time All-Star and won the Cy Young Award 3 times. He left Texas for Montreal in 1995. He won his first CYA that year. He won his second the next year. In 2001, still with the Expos, he won his third.

His best season was probably 1996. In that year, he won a career high 19 games vs 7 losses. He struck out 268 batters while walking 76 in 246 1/3 innings as he led the Expos to WS victory.

In 2005, at the age of 36, he signed as a Free Agent with Colorado. He put up extraordinary numbers pitching in the Mile High City. He posted a 16-12 record with an OOTP ERA of 3.14 as he struck out 255 men while only walking 64 in 258 1/3 innings.

In 2006 he would post a 15-14 record for the Rockies. That would be his last season above .500. 27 wins away from 300, he played out his contract in Colorado. He then went to Kansas City for a year before joining the Cubs for his final season. He managed 20 wins in these three seasons while taking 31 losses. He retired after his one season in Chicago.

Carlton enters the Hall by virtue of his Gray Ink number being above that of the Hall average.

Black Ink: 29 (69)
Gray Ink: 223 (285)
HOFm: 177.8 (266)
HOFs: 50 (58)

Gorilla Composite: 3.7 (5.8)

---------------------

Mike Moore is the first 30 game winner to be inducted into the HOF. He gets the Denny McClain tab as being the last pitcher to accomplish that feat by doing so in 1978 when he went 30-5. 4 pitchers have won 30 games in a season in this league.

Selected as the 14th player in the Inaugural Draft, Moore posted 113 wins in his first 5 seasons.

Moore won the CYA in that 30-5 1978 season as he posted an OOTP ERA of 2.20 for a npa ERA+ of 181. He struck out 243 and walked 82 as he logged 347 2/3 IP, the 5th most single season IP total in league history.

For his career, Moore was 210-132 with an OOTP ERA of 3.21 (npa ERA+ 133).

His career 148 CGs is 7th most all time. His 29 career shutouts is 9th most.

Moore appeared in 2 AS games (the lowest of any inducted pitcher) and won a GG. Moore made one post season appearance, but never played in a WS.

Moore enters on the Veteran Standard.

Black Ink: 20 (4)
Gray Ink: 162 (81)
HOFm: 109 (32)
HOFs: 46 (14)

Gorilla Composite: 2.9 (1.6)

----------------------------

Camilo Pascual becomes the 8th player to enter this this HOF that was entered in the previous HOF. He is also the first pitcher to be inducted into both.

Pascual was not inducted by the software, but is clearly HOF worthy, as a Sandy Koufax type of entry.

Pascual was drafted by the Mets with the 3rd overall pick in 1996. At the age of 32 he suffered an elbow injury that required surgery and 9 months of rehab. Though he tried to come back and logged 2 seasons in AAA after the injury, he never pitched in the major leagues after this injury.

In 1999 Pascual won the first of his 4 Cy Young Awards. He won three consecutive CYAs from 2001-2003. In that 3 year span, he posted a record of 57-21with 852 Ks while walking only 183. He won the pitching Triple Crown in 2002 and 2003.

For his career, he posted a record of 188-111 with an OOTP ERA of 3.23, which makes for a npa ERA+ 141. The 188 wins is the lowest total of any starter in the HOF. The 111 losses is also the lowest total of any starter in the HOF. No player in the HOF has more than 4 CYAs.

Pascual appeared in 7 AS games. In 2003 he led the Mets to a WS title.

Pascual enters by virtue of his Black Ink total being above the Hall average.

Black Ink: 46 (21)
Gray Ink: 182 (123)
HOFm: 151.5 (62)
HOFs: 41 (22)

Gorilla Composite: 3.7 (1.9)
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Old 02-12-2013, 01:22 PM   #25
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Class of 2018 (1946) Pitchers, Part 2: Hughson, Branca, Kilroy

This is the first time I have played OOTP into a "future" in many versions. Houston did not move into the AL. I read a thread regarding this on the main board and learned they should have, if I had league evolution on. Well, I had league evolution on. I wanted league evolution on (I didn't want 70 years of static game modifiers), but Houston didn't move...why?!?!

Well, I checked, and, NOPE!, I didn't have league evolution checked. User error is again the culprit. I considered how to handle this. I decided to engage league evolution now. If Houston switches, cool. If they don't, fine, it's a make believe world. But I didn't want to get into anything more involved (which gives me more opportunity for user error) that might truly screw up the league.

We will see what happens when the upcoming season is run. I do the inductions at the beginning of the pre-season, so if they move, they should move for 2019, I think. It's a small item, but it is worth noting.

--------------------------

Tex Hughson is another repeat entrant. He was inducted into the previous Hall in 1946, the same class as this one.

Hughson was taken with 6th overall pick in 1978 by the Angels. In 1979 he posted a record of 24-11 with an OOTP ERA of 2.58 (npa ERA+ 165). He tossed a career high 7 shutouts (tied for 9th most all time in a season) and his 20 complete games was one shy of what would be his career best.

5 times he posted 20 or more wins in a season. He led the league in wins 3 times. In 1983 he led the league in wins and ERA going 21-11 with a 2.15 OOTP ERA (npa ERA+ 190).

He retired following the 1989 season with a career record of 188-124 and an OOTP ERA of 3.39 (npa ERA+ 124). He struck out 1857 batters while walking 781. His 33 career shutouts ties him for 6th most all time. His 151 career CGs is also 6th most.

Hughson appeared in 4 All Star games, but never in a post season.

Hughson enters the Hall by virtue of his Black Ink number being above the Hall average.

Black Ink: 40
Gray Ink: 158
HOFm: 92
HOFs: 37

Gorilla Composite: 3.0

----------------------------

Ralph Branca was the second player taken in the 1974 Inaugural Draft. Selected by the Mets, he pitched in the Majors through 1989 and compiled a record of 208-159 and an OOTP ERA of 3.22 (npa ERA+ 126).

With a shortage pf quality pitching in the eary years of the league, Branca put up some incredible single season marks. His rookie year, he struck out 422 batters in 322 1/3 IP. He struck ut over 300 batters each of the next 3 seasons, also.

Proving he just wasn't a freak talent distribution phenom, in 1981 he won the CY Young Award by going 18-9 with an OOTP ERA of 2.74 (npa ERA+ of 127). He struck out 210 batters in 282 1/3 IP while walking 64. He tossed 15 CGs (tied career high).

Branca threw 33 career shut outs, which ties him for sixth plce on the All-Time list with fellow classmate Tex Hughson.

Branca appeared in 4 AS games. He was also on 4 WS winning teams, all with different clubs. In 14 post season starts he had a record of 9-2 and an OOTP ERA of 1.90.

He won with the Mets in 1975. He joined the Brewers as a Free Agent in 1980 and won there with a squad that also featured HOFers Count Campau and Adrian Gonzalez.

As a Red Sox in 1986, he won with fellow HOFers Jim Wynn and Matt Cain. The next season, 1987, he pitched the Cardinals to WS glory.

From 1974 through 1978, Branca struck out 3040 batters (16th) while walking 1154.

Branca enters on the Veteran Standard.

Black Ink: 20
Gray Ink: 181
HOFm: 127.5
HOFs: 43

Gorilla Composite: 3.0

---------------------------

Matt Kilroy put together the most extraordinary seasons I have ever seen in a post 19th Century environment.

An incomplete highlight listing includes:

Most career CGs, 188
Most career shutouts, 38
Lowest single season ERA, 0.85
Most wins in a season, 31
Highest season win%, .938
Most strikeouts in a season, 591
Fewest H/9 in a season, 4.14
Most K/9 in a season, 15.46
Season VORP, 142.7
Season WHIP, 0.60
OPP BA season, .135
OPP SLG season, .176
OPP OPS season, .374
WAR season, 24.7

All of the season records came from 1974 and 1975.

In 1974 he was 30-2 with an OOTP ERA of 0.85. That's good for an npa ERA+ of 433(!!!).

In 1975 he was 31-4 with an OOTP ERA of 1.23. That was good for a npa ERA+ of 313(!!).

In those two seasons he struck out a combined 1137 batters while walking only 95 men in 681 IP. He surrendered 19 HRs total in these two seasons.

As I noted on the General Discussion board, at the time, the league totals were dead on. The quality pitchers, of whom there were very few, put up incredible numbers because they were simply that much better than their competition. It was like the hitters were seeing borderline Class A pitchers 90% of the time, then they faced a legit ML All Star, and they had no chance. As far as this league goes, since baseball started in 1974, the hitters had never seen anything like Kilroy or Branca until they saw Kilroy and Branca. As the league evolved and more pitchers joined who were of their calliber, the hitters became more accustomed to seeing this level of pitching and they adjusted and the pitching ouptuts leveled off.

For his career, Kilroy was 222-146 with an OOTP ERA of 3.11 which made for a npa ERA+ of an incredible 166 for his career. His 222 wins are 15th most All-Time. His 2771 strikeouts are 23rd most.

Kilroy pitched in 4 All Star games. He won the second ever WS with the Brewers in 1974. He was the first player taken in the first amateur draft (1973).

He also won with them in 1980, when a newly acquired Ralph Branca made for a wicked 1-2 punch from the rotation.

Kilroy won 2 CYAs. He enters this HOF, like Hughson, in tfe same class he entered the previous one. He enters on the Veteran Standard.

Black Ink: 35
Gray Ink: 145
HOFm: 149.9
HOFs: 48

Gorilla Composite: 3.4

Last edited by VanillaGorilla; 02-14-2013 at 12:42 AM. Reason: Corrected Kilroy's draft status. Was not the first pick of the Inagural Draft. Count Campau was the first taken there.
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Old 02-13-2013, 09:42 PM   #26
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Class of 2019 (1947) Hitters: Doyle, Saier

I turned on league evolution, and Houston remained in the NL. However, Expansion teams did sprout up in Dallas and Jacksonville. That was cool. Both went to the American League. This has really thrown a new and HUGE variable into the financial structure in the league.

Both teams entered the league with budgets around $90M. Teams didn't protect their high salaried guys. Both teams said, "Screw it" and have payrolls close to $300M. After taking all the superstar salaries that they did, there is only one other team with a salary total over $100M, at this writing, for the 2019 season. Both Dallas and Jax are looking at being $200M in red ink, but they are both STACKED. We will see many entries in about 20 years that were taken in this expansion draft.

------------------------------------------

Larry Doyle is the latest multiple entry into the HOF(s), and the first of a pair of noteworthy non-HOFers from the 1910s.

Doyle was the 4th player selected in the 1974 draft. He went to the Padres. He was immediately named the #1 prospect in the league.

In a career that spanned through the 1990 season, Doyle collected 2058 hits and batted .301. Injuries caused him to play in less than 100 games in 7 of his 16 seasons. Counting the partial seasons, he batted over .300 10 times. He only played in 147 games 3 times in his career. He never reached the 200 hit plateau.

Doyle cracked 244 HRs and stole 401 bases (39th). As a 2Bman, Doyle is the career leader in runs with 1164, hits with 2058, TB with 3273, and RBI with 1056. His 190 career errors is also the most for a 2Bman. No, he did not win a Gold Glove.

However, he did win 2 MVPS. Doing what no RL player did, he played 162 games in 1981....he posted a career high 31 HRs, a career high 198 hits, a still standing record for 2Bmen of 137 RBI, and led the league in TB and runs scored (career high 124) while slashing 310/377/515 (npa OPS+ 158).

In his encore 1982 season, he again took home the Barry Bonds Best Batter Award (Brought to you By Balko) as he slashed 336/410/536 (npa OPS+ 169) in 143 games.

His MVP seasons were his only 2 in Milwaukee (which he joined from the Padres as a Free Agent.

Cashing in on the MVPs, he declined his option year and became a Free Agent. He signed with Houston. Though he won no more MVPs, he was a key part of Astros WS winning teams in 1983 and 1984. He is the first player to enter the Hall from those teams. He will not be the last.

Doyle played in 5 AS games as he slashed a career line of 301/377/478. Considering that all but two of his seasons were played in either the Murph or the Dome, his career npa OPS+ of 141 is quite astounding.

Doyle enters by virtue of his HOFs number being above the Hall average.

Black Ink: 11
Gray Ink: 106
HOFm: 110
HOFs: 52

Gorilla Composite: 2.9

---------------------------

Vic Saier was slected by the Cardinals with the 22nd pick in the 1993 draft. Playing through the 2007 season, Saier won 6 GGs at 1B, was a four time All-Star, and like his classmate, he won two MVPs.

In RL Saier was a triples hitter. Thrown into a late 20th/early 21st century environment, he hit HRs. 473 for his career (22nd).

Saier won his MVPs in 1996 and 1998. However, in 1997 he hit a career high 69 HRs while slashing 311/411/721 (npa OPS+ 196). This was a better year in all categories than his MVP season of the previous campaign. Saier turned it up another notch in 1998 to get the trophy again. He ripped a line f 349/465/713 that gave him a npa OPS+ of 217.

8 times Saier took his team to the post season. Somehow, in spite of hitting .315 and a HR in nearly every 10 post season ABS, Saier never played in a WS.

For his career he slashed 284/381/561(27th) for a npa OPS+ of 149.

Saier gets in on the Veteran Standard, being just a hair ( a hair being a point or two) below the Hall averages in each: Gray Ink, HOFm, HOFs.

This was Saier's first screening, as he was not a software induction. This was also his first year to enter as a Vet. Doyle gets in without using the Veteran Standard, but Saier has the higher GC.

Black Ink: 14
Gray Ink: 131
HOFm: 160
HOFs: 46

Gorilla Composite: 3.4

Last edited by VanillaGorilla; 02-14-2013 at 12:39 AM. Reason: The 1974 draft was not the first amateur draft. The first was held following the 1973 season, in 1973.
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Old 02-14-2013, 03:02 PM   #27
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Class of 2019 (1947) Pitchers: Whitney, Baldwin

I left my computer on last night, and while I was sleeping I received the Microsoft updates and my computer restarted. I was terrified to open up my spreadsheets and OOTP. I couldn't remember for sure if I had saved my work or if the work I had done was autosaved in the process. Well, it was a mixed bag.

I do the inductions at the start of the preseason. When I started up OOTP I got the dreaded "there are text messages later than the last saved date." Having screwed up a previous league by keeping them, I always delete them now.

The interesting find was that the HOF inductions were no longer in the news, but the HOF was still populated by the four players from 2019 (I had decided to do this post after I had slept). This is quite cool...once you are in the HOF you are in!

I lost about 20 screenings of pitchers, but that is no big deal. I am glad that I only had to go through 20 pitchers to get the 2 inductees instead of 100. That would have been so much more painful.

So there are about 20 pitchers who are getting a little a bit of reprieve before they are removed from the spreadsheet. Therefore, they have a slightly greater chance of getting in later than if I had saved before the update/reboot.

I am not going to sweat this. I will just chalk it up to another aspect of the fickle nature of the HOF selection process and move forward.

-----------------------------------------

Jim Whitney was the second player taken, overall, in the 1987 draft. He went to the Braves. He played for the Braves his entire career. He retired following the 2001 season.

Whitney was dominant, until injuries took their toll starting in 1997.

His resume includes 5 ASGs, a GG, and 2 CYAs. But those do not tell the complete story.

Whitney enters with the highest Black Ink total of any pitcher inducted, thus far.

3 times he led the league in starts and IP. He led the league in wins twice. He led in strikeouts 4 times. He led the league in ERA four times. He had one Triple Crown season.

Though these are not Ink categories, he led the league in WHIP 4 times, and K/BB 5 times.

Back to the Black Ink, he led the league in BB/9 an amazing SIX times.

He led the league in WAR and VORP 6 times.

He posted a career record of 169-116 with an OOTP ERA of 3.40 (npa ERA+ 132). He struck out 2185 men while walking 689 in 2711 IP.

In his 1990 Triple Crown season, he was 20-8 with an OOTP ERA of 2.21 (npa ERA+ 178). He struck out 329 batters (career high) while walking 41 in 277 1/3 IP (Career high).

In his second CYA season, 1992, he led the Braves to a WS win as he went 20-7 in the regular season. He won 3 of 4 starts in that post season.

Whitney gets in by virtue of his Black Ink score being above the Hall average.

Black Ink: 65
Gray Ink: 145
HOFm: 123.6
HOFs: 33

Gorilla Composite: 3.7

-------------------------

Mark Baldwin enters the Hall as the first pitcher, now, in the alphabetical listing of pitchers. His classmate, Whitney, is the last. Meaningless, but fun.

Like Whitney, Baldwin spent his entrie career with one team. He was also drafted with the second overall pick. In 1981 he was taken by the red Sox and stayed with them until he retired after the 1994 season.

For his career, Baldwin was 197-121 with an OOTP ERA of 3.47 (npa ERA+ 121).

A 2 time All Star, and a GG winner, Baldwin won the Cy Youn Award in 1985 as he went 25-9 with an OOTP ERA of 2.97 and a npa ERA+ (in Fenway) of 133.

In each of his first 9 seasons, Baldwin struck out at least 200 batters. In 1984 he racked up a career high 271 Ks.

Baldwin was not the dominant pitcher of his era that Whitney was. But he was rock solid. He won at least 13 games a season in his first 11 years. Then he was felled by injury and underwent Tommy John surgery. He no longer was the same pitcher, after that, and he retired at the age of 34.

He pitched the Red Sox into the post season every year from 1984 through 1990. Obviously the organization was strong year to year and a quality pitcher would be expected to post a good W/L record under such circumstances. But he was a key element to the Sox success.

In 1986 he led the staff, which included HOFers Matt Cain and Ralph Branca, in IP and K, as the Red Sox won the WS. Baldwin was 20-9, 2.93 in the regular season. Twice inducted HOFer Jimmy Wynn was also on that team.

In 1990, with Branca and Cain departed, but Wynn still present, Bladwin anchored the Red Sox rotation to WS glory as he led the staff in reg season W, IP, K, and ERA (19-9, 2.62).

Baldwin gets in on the Veteran Standard and is precisely the sort of player that should. A solid starter for a decade with perennial post season success who, because of injury, didn't accumulate what is considered HOF career totals. But looking at the complete picture, he belongs....and what a staff the 1986 Red Sox had....3 HOFers.

He is the 12th player to be inducted into both HOFs.

Black Ink: 14
Gray Ink: 150
HOFm: 131.1
HOFs: 37

Gorilla Composite: 2.6
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Old 02-15-2013, 09:03 AM   #28
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Class of 2020 (1948): Pratt, Ott

A duo of dual monosyllabic monikers enters in this class.

Al Pratt, the first dual monosyllabic moniker, is the 13th player to enter this HOF that was also enshrined in the previous one.

Pratt was the fifth player selected in the 2000 draft. He went to the Tigers.

In 2001 he took the league by storm. He posted a 21-9 record with an OOTP ERA of 2.19...kinda cool that the digits of his record parallels his ERA. His npa ERA + for that campaign was what would be a career best 211. In 247 innings he struck out what would also be a career high 343 batters, while walking only 71. He would strike out 3000 batters in a season 4 more times before he retired following the 2017 season. This was easilly good enough to win the ROY, but he came up short in the CYA voting, this time.

Pratt enters the Hall as the All-Time career strikeout leader with 4489.

In 2014 he became the second pitcher (Steve Carlton was the first) to notch his 4000th career strikeout. Through 2014 he had posted a career record of 195-138.

In early 2015 he suffered a season ending elbow injury that required surgery. He continued to play in the majors through 2017, but he was never the same pitcher following that injury.

He retired with a career record of 208 (26th) -173 and an OOTP ERA of 3.60 (npa ERA+ 126). In his 14 seasons before the injury, his ERA+ was lower than his career average just 5 times, with a low of 91).

In 2010 he won the CYA while a Washington National. He had an 18-9 record, 2.87 OOTP ERA (npa ERA+ 145), and struck out 294 men in 222 1/3 IP and walked only 55.

His career K/9 rate of 11.491 is the best of any HOFer, and he places 4th on that list as he is inducted into the Hall. The HOFer closest to him in that category is Hugh O'Neil (11.260). O'Neil made all of his 1049 ML appearances in relief. Of Pratt's 526 career games, 523 were as a starter. To have this rate and not be a relief specialist is astounding. 9 times Pratt was the league leader in Ks.

In post season play, Pratt struck out 75 men in 61 1/3 IP. He appeared in 1 WS in 3 post seasons, but he never won a title. Pratt was an All-Star sixt times. He enters the Hall by virtue of his Black and Gray Ink numbers being above the Hall average.

Black Ink: 47
Gray Ink: 196
HOFm: 149.5
HOFs: 38

Gorilla Composite: 3.7

-----------------------------

Mel Ott, the other dual monosyllabic moniker to enter this year, joins with a career HR total of 644, 6th all time. All eligible players with more HRs are already enshrined. This explains Ott's induction as a First Balloter on the First Ballot Standard.

Ott was drafted by the Angels in 2002 as the 6th pick in the draft. His 2387 hits place him 33rd on that career list. His 1723 RBI place him 10th and his 1611 runs scored place him 7th on those respective lists.

Ott drew 1441 walks in his career (6th) as he posted a career slash line of 281/389/560 for an npa OPS+ of 154 (compare to RL OPS+ of 155).

Ott appeared in 10 All Star Games, and in 2006 he had his first of two career high 61 HR seasons (his two seasons leading the league in HR) and won the league MVP as he slashed 321/426/702 with the Angels team that drafted him, but had moved to Los Angeles from California, Maryland, the year before.

Ott ranks 9th on the WAR list and 10th on the VORP list for his career.

Ott won 3 WS with 3 different teams. In his post season career, he hit 20 HRs in 262 ABs over 7 Octobers. In 2010 he won with the Tigers. In 2014 he won with the Yankees. In 2016 he won with the Phillies. He is the first player from any of these teams to be inducted into the Hall.

Ott won a GG in LF.

Black Ink: 24 (50)
Gray Ink: 214 (277)
HOFm: 226 (217)
HOFs: 67 (69)

Gorilla Composite: 5.2 (6.6)
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Old 02-17-2013, 03:53 PM   #29
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Class of 2021 (1949): Shields, Mullane, Mitchell

As I posted on the main board, the expansion Dallas Burn won the WS in their first two seasons as both expansion squads blew up the economic status quo of the league and became instant powerhouses when the teams did not protect their big contract players in their playing primes.

Using league evolution is a new aspect of OOTP for me. Before this past (2020) season, a rule change was implemented that made the minimum DL stay 19 days. I didn't think this was significant enough to note, by itself. Going into the 2011 season, the season has been shortened to 158 games. This, obviously, has an impact on the HOF numbers being tabulated.


This will have no effect on the Ink categories, but this does impact the the HOFm point accumulation, and to a very slight degree, the HOFs accumulation.

This also makes it much more significant when a single season total record is broken, in the future.

----------------------------

James Shields was drafted by the Rangers with the 7th overall pick in the 1974 draft. He retired following the 1990 season with a career record of 218-165 and an OOTP ERA of 3.38 (npa ERA+ 128).

He struck out 2780 (28th) batters in 3519 1/3 IP while walking 880. He pitched 153 Complete Games (5th) in his career. 35 of those were shutouts (4th).

4 times he won 20 games. For some reason, he was only named to 1 All Star team. That year was 1976. For that season he won 23 games and struck out 340 and posted a npa ERA+ of 198. But he didn't win the Cy Young Award, that season.

He did win the CYA in 1984 in a campaign that saw him post a record of 23-6 and a 3.38 OOTP ERA as a member of the Yankees. East coast bias??? His npa ERA+ that season was a good, but not a typical CYA winning, figure of 128. He was not named to the All-Star team for this season.

In 1977 he was 28-9 in the regular season as he led the Rangers to a WS win. He struck out 272 batters that year while walking only 35. He is the first player to be inducted into the HOF from that Rangers team.

In that 1977 post season, Shields was 3-0 in 4 starts. He struck out 34 men in 30 2/3 IP and walked only 1 batter the entire post season.

In 1979 he started, what stands as the league record, 42 games. His 218 wins places him 19th on the All-Time list.

Shields enters on the Veteran Standard.

Black Ink: 12
Gray Ink: 159
HOFm: 109.4
HOFs: 43

Gorilla Composite: 2.6

--------------------------------

Tony Mullane is a player I expect to be inducted into the RL HOF, eventually. Based on the numbers used for this HOF (the new adjusted ones, which raises the standard whenever I commented on the likes of RL players being RL Hall-worthy in the previous thread) Mullane should be inducted.

Here, there is no need for an argument. Mullane did not get in on his first ballot screening, but were this to be his first year of eligibility, he would have been in on that standard, as all 4 of his numbers are above the current Hall averages. He enters with the highest GC of any pitcher to be inducted, thus far.

Mullane was the first player chosen in the 1975 draft. Taken by the Cardinals, he played with them from 1976-1990. He made stops in San Diego, Baltimore, and Texas before retiring in 1995.

Mullane won 287 games in his career, third most, whil being tagged with 189 losses which gives him a career win% of .6029. His career OOTP ERA of 3.27 makes for a npa ERA+ of 127.

His 3533 strikeouts are 7th most, All-Time. He threw 143 CGs (9th) and 34 shutouts (5th) in his career.

He ranks 5th on the All-Time WAR list. No eligible player ahead of him is not already in the HOF.

In his 1976 debut season, he won ROY honors as he made the Cardinal scouts look good with their recommendation to select Mullane. He went 25-8, OOTP ERA 2.51 (npa ERA+ 149) as he struck out 365 batters in 330 IP while walking only 73.

Mullane appeared as an All Star 6 times and he won 2 CYAs. One was in his rookie 1976 season, the other was in 1980 when he posted career bests in wins, ERA, and ERA+ (26-5, 2.26, 179). He also racked up a career best 6 shutouts in 1980.

He brought the WS trophy to St Louis in 1982 and in 1987. Ralph Branca was on the 1987 winning team. No player, other than Mullane, has been inducted into the HOF, yet.

Black Ink: 65 (28)
Gray Ink: 250 (202)
HOFm: 204.5 (169)
HOFs: 54 (51)

Gorilla Composite: 5.1 (3.7)

------------------------------------

Kevin Mitchell became eligible the same year as Mel Ott. The Selection comittee opted to enter Ott on the first ballot, but bowing to pressure from PETA, the ASPCA, and cat lovers everywhere, they made Mitchell wait.

But they could not keep him out of the Hall, as he was a dominant force for years.

As Bobby Murcer in the previous league played his way into the HOF as a SS while in RL he was an OFer, Mitchell fit this same billing.

Mitchell Played 600 games as an OFer, but he played 1300 games in the IF, with almost 100 games logged at SS. His career EFF of 1.014 a SS is certainly adequate, and if you get a guy that can play adequate SS while smacking 592 career HRs (7th), that's a pretty good deal.

Taken as the 5th player in the 2001 draft by the Phillies, Mitchell remained in Philadelphia through the 2016 season. He signed a minor league deal with the Dodgers in 2017 and then a 2yr ML contract with $1.6M, total. But he was done. He had only 30 ABs as a Dodger. So, he didn't play his entire career as a Phillie, but all of his meaningful time was as a Phillie.

His 1534 career RBI place him 16th on the All-Time list. He scored 1300 runs, on the nose (36th). His 2187 career hits is 54th most, and 15 ahead of the next player on the list, Inaugural Class Inductee Mark McGwire.

In his rookie season, he hit 48 HRs while batting .313 and drove in 128 to take ROY honors.

During his career he went to 8 ASGs, and won 3 MVPs between 2004 and 2007. In his 2006 MVP season he posted career highs in hits (204) doubles (37), HR (65), RBI (179), R (137), and walks (81). His slash line of 324/409/700 contained a career high OBP and career high slg%. The npa OPS+ for this season was another career high (194).

For his career he slashed 292/366/589 which made for a nap OPS+ of 155.

Mitchell missed the entire 2015 season due to injury. At age 35, in his final season with the club, a no longer dominant Mitchell contributed as a bench player to the Phillies WS winning effort. Fellow HOF Mel Ott was also on this club.

By the time 2016 rolled around, Mitchell was just hanging on. Still, he batted .263 in the post season, but his power was gone, and he hit no HRs. In 2 previous post seasons, he had hit 14 HRs in 100 ABs.

Though not a First Ballotter, Mitchell gets in on the First Ballot Standard.

ADD: Mitchell hit 354 HRs as a SS, the most in league history. In 2006, all of his HRs and RBI were as a SS. They are both single season SS records. His career slg% of .587 and OPS of .957 at SS are also records for the position.

Black Ink: 37 (11)
Gray Ink: 150 (46)
HOFm: 245.5 (38)
HOFs: 63 (23)

Gorilla Composite: 5.3 (1.5)

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Old 02-17-2013, 06:21 PM   #30
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Hall Chart

There will be no inductions for the 2022 season, so I decided to post the current Hall Chart. The average CG is currently 3.88. It is interesting to see plots clustered along the 4 line and 5 line, but none filling up the in between spots. I think this is but an anomaly, but time will show if this is a trend, for whatever reason.

The two low plots on the left are Hugh O'Neil and Alex Serrano, the two relief specialists inducted. The HOFs number is not designed to accommodate RPs, so this is why their scores are low, relative to the rest of the Hall.

The floor is firmly established at the 3 line. There have been no floor breaking entries. We probably won't see any until the 5 year wait after retirement takes effect. Even then, as things are shaping up, I don't know if we will see any.
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Old 02-18-2013, 02:43 AM   #31
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Capsule Explanation of Entry Standards and Their Effects

There are 4 different standards that can get a player inducted into the HOF using this method.

1) First Ballot Standard

Players who are entered into the Hall of Fame by the default OOTP settings are given a First Ballot Screening. If the score (normalized for hitters and pitchers) of the Black Ink + Gray Ink AND the combined score of the HOFm + HOFs are BOTH above the HOF average of all the players inducted in the previous years, that player is inducted on the Fisrt Ballot Standard. No other screenings are used for any hitters before all hitters that were inducted by the OOTP default standards are given a First Ballot Screening. This also applies to pitchers. No pitchers are given Standard/Veteran Screenings before all pitchers that have earned a First Ballot Screening are given their First Ballot Screening.

When a player is inducted via a FBS, that player, by virtue of his numbers being sufficient for a FBS induction, raises the standard that will be applied to players who receive a FBS in subsequent years. This is not a result of any adjustment I do seperate from the numbers. It is simply the result of the math. Adding scores that are above the old averages results in the new averages being higher.

2) Standard Standard

If a player going through the normal screening process has ANY score (Black Ink, Gray Ink, HOFm, OR HOFs) above the average of any category of the players that were inducted in the previous years, that player is inducted by the Standard Standard.

A player may have more than one score above the previous average, but it is not a requirement.

When a player is entered in this fashion, I make note of which category, or categories, he exceeded the old average(s).

So, any player entered through the Standard Standard will raise the average in AT LEAST one category for subsequent classes.

3) Veteran Standard

There is no priority given to the order of screenings in regard to the Standard Standard and Veteran Standard. Whatever player has bubbled up to the top of the list is screened. If he has been retired for 20 years, he is eligible to enter on the Veteran Standard.

As with the First Ballot Standard, the combined Ink scores and combined HOF scores are used to determine entry. If BOTH of those scores are CLOSE to the Hall averages, that player gets in on the Veteran Standard. If the player has a score in ANY category that is above the Hall average, that player, even though he has been retired for 20 years and is eligible to enter on the Veteran Standard, is considered to have entered on the Standard Standard.

When a player enters on the Veteran Standard, he brings down the averages in ALL 4 categories (and, by definition, the combined score categories) and, thus, makes it easier for players in subsequent classes to enter via the Standard Standard.

However, while a player entering on the VS makes it easier for subsequent players to enter on the SS, when a player enters on the VS he is actually raising the VS for future classes. There is a numeric method to this. It actually works out cooler than I thought it did until I completed the previous posted HOF. There is nothing subjective about how the numbers are applied, here.

4) Leader Boards

When no one on the spreadsheets meet the criteria for Standard or Veteran inductions, I go to the Leader Boards. It is here that the HOF can get "floor breakers."

A "floor breaker" is a player who has insufficient scores to enter via the SS or VS, but is given enshrinement based on a leader board position. When a "floor breaker" enters, he lowers the standards in ALL categories for future induction classes. He also lowers the VS of induction at this same time.

Not all players that enter from the leader boards are floor breakers, but all players that are floor breakers enter from the leader boards.

Aside from the Inaugural Class, there have been no leader board entrants, as of yet, in this Hall.

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Old 02-18-2013, 03:55 AM   #32
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Class of 2023 (1951): Baker, Walsh

I made the previous post in order to succinctly reestablish some concepts that were explained in the previous HOF thread. I am not sure how successful I was at being succinct, but I wanted to acquaint any new followers to these concepts and also explain how the inductions of players by various methods will impact how future players are selected.

It is to this point that I hoped my model would execute. Instead of having a static set of standards for HOF inductions, as is the current model used in OOTP (yes, they are customizable, but they are static until the user adjusts them again), I hoped to come up with a method that is both dynamic and objective.

Why did Burt Blyleven recieve less than 20% approval for entry to the RL HOF in his first three years on the ballot, but 10 years later he gets nearly 80% approval? He didn't retire a single batter in that time. His record was static, but the standard of entry via the voting process is a dynamic one.

Because the RL HOF has dynamic standards, I hoped to create a HOF for OOTP that also has dynamic standards in order to better simulate the HOF induction process. I also wanted to make this process completely objective because if it is completely objective, it is completely programmable.

--------------------------

You can blame Dusty Baker for the previous post and the introduction to this one.

Baker enters on the slimmest margin possible. He gets in because his HOFs number is JUST above the Hall average. But, that isn't all. The fact that the number he has is just above the Hall average is a function of less than a tenth of a percentage point, otherwise he would need one more HOFs point for entry. If he didn't get in on the Standard Standard, he would not have gotten in. His combined Ink score was not sufficient to meet the VS requirement.

In fact, if ANY of the previous players inducted had just ONE more HOFs point, Baker would not have been entered this year. And there would be no promise that the HOFs number would ever fall back, or if it did, if he would be screened before it went back up.

The narrative can be constructed that the players who received FBS consideration, but did not meet FBS criteria will eventually get in, but the Selection Committee decided, at this time, to honor Baker.

And with Baker entering, future inductees will be considered in the light of Baker being enshrined and this will make it easer for others to enter.

Dusty Baker hit 400 HRs in his career. Not 399 or 401. This places him 47th on the All Time list on the date of his induction. His 2544 hits places him 22nd.

Baker was the 7th player drafted in the 1983 draft. He went to the Red Sox.

A 3 time All Star, Baker won 2 GGs in the OF and in 1990 he won the league MVP as he led the Red Sox to their second title since he joined the team. In 130 games, he slashed 332/412/574 for a npa OPS+ of 175. He hit 31 HRs, drove in 105 and scored 100.

For his career, he slashed 298/368/499 for a npa OPS+ of 137.

Only once did Baker play in more than 146 games in a season. In 1990, he led the league in slg%. This is his only Black Ink score.

Baker epitomizes a bubble pick for the HOF. Under the slightest different of circumstances, numerically, he doesn't get in.

Baker was a good guy, and he does get in in a year where 2 players with better scores received FBS consideration but had personality or off-field issues. The model, here, has effectively simulated RL.

Jimmy Wynn and Mark Baldwin are fellow HOFers who played on both or Baker's WS winning teams. Matt Cain and Ralph Branca were part of the 1986 winning team.

Baker's numbers are as close to being that of a floor breaker without being an actual floor breaker. Baker retired following the 2002 season.

Black Ink: 3 (0)
Gray Ink: 65 (47)
HOFm: 120.5 (25)
HOFs: 49 (24)

Gorilla Composite: 2.4 (1.0)

--------------------------------------

Jimmy Walsh becomes the 14th player to be entered in this HOF who was entered in the previous HOF.

Walsh was drafted by the Royals with the 13th pick in the 1999 draft.

He left KC in 2006 to join the Braves as a Free Agent. He made a stop in St Louis before returning to Kansas City in 2013. He retired as a Royal after the 2014 season.

In his career he hit 413 HRs. That places him 43rd on the All Time list. He played over 1500 games a catcher. His 361 HRs as a C are 4th most in league history.

For his career, he slashed 307/353/546 for a npa OPS+ of 138. His 518 career doubles is 18th most, All Time. That places him one slot above Inaugural HOFer Gary Sheffield, in that category.

A six time All-Star, Walsh hit 30 or more HRs 8 times in his career. He won WS titles with the Royals in 2002 and 2004. Inaugural HOFer George Davies was a teammate on both squads. Fellow Two Time HOFer Duke Snider was a teammate in 2002.

Walsh enters with HOFm and HOFs numbers above the current Hall averages.

Black Ink: 3
Gray Ink: 104
HOFm: 207.5
HOFs: 68

Gorilla Composite: 3.6

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Old 02-18-2013, 11:37 AM   #33
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Class of 2024 (1952): Konetchy, Dawson

If only I could have planned out what happened in the screening. It dovetails right into the previous posts about the dynamism of the HOF model. 2 players were screened (batters) who both hold claims to entry based on their HOFs score. Both had scores of 49, the score Dusty Baker had last class. Had Baker Been inducted alone and, thusly, the threshold for breaking the Hall ave of HOFs had remained at 49, we would have had two different entrants. But, since Jimmy Walsh joined in the same class with a HOFs score above 49, that threshold is now over 49.

It could fall back and those players will be noted if they enter, or it may continue to rise. Though Baker's entry did help bring down the standards in other categories (as did Walsh's for Black and Gray Ink) the score needed to be deemed Hall worthy on the SS has risen. If the two entrants that did get in had been at the top of the list to start with, then I never would have seen this happen. Also, had Baker been inducted alone and the two players who did get in were at the top of the list, it would not have mattered, because they got in on standards that were unaffected by the Walsh entry raising the HOFs number.

This is what is happening behind the scenes. I don't know who will get in, or when they will get in, until they are in. I know that some players are highly probable to get in, eventually, but it is the workings of these bubble entries that really fascinate me.

------------------------------

Ed Konetchy was selected by the Expos as the 4th player in the 1992 draft. From 1994 to 2000 he played in every game. In 2001, he broke his elbow 5 games into the season and missed the rest of that year. In 2002, he was fully healed and played in 162 games and hit a career high average of .343 and slugged a career high .561 and had a career high npa OPS+ of 158 while collecting another career high of 216 base hits as a member of the Chicago Cubs. In 2003 he again played 162 games.

His career lasted through the 2007 season, which found him north of the border, again, as a Toronto Blue Jay. For his career he collected 2428 hits (29th, ahead 1 spot of HOFer Adrian Gonzalez) and slashed 309/378/493 (npa OPS+133).

Konetchy played on 5 All-Star teams and collected 200 or more hits in a season 5 times, as well. He hit 272 HRs and stole 289 bases. In 1996 he and fellow HOFer Steve Carlton brought Montreal a WS title. Paid attendance for the Game 5 clincher was 11,110....okay, I made up the attendance figure....

Konetchy enters by virtue of his HOFs nmber being above the Hall average.

Black Ink: 14 (4)
Gray Ink: 97 (149)
HOFm: 126 (16)
HOFs: 56 (19)

Gorilla Composite: 3.2 (1.7)

--------------------------------

Andre Dawson is the 50th entrant into this HOF. Surprisingly, he is only the 7th RL HOFer to be enshrined, here.

Is ironic that Dawson's classmate left the Expos to join the Cubs. It is also ironic that their numbers, while different, wind up resulting in the same GC score rounded to the tenth.

Dawson scored a 49 in the HOFs metric. However, he had retired in 1996 and was, therefore, eligible to be inducted on the Veteran Standard. His composites were within range and he gets a spot in the converted tractor shed.

Dawson was chosen by the Braves with the 8th overall pick in 1977. Unlike Konetchy, and true to real life, he battled through knee and ankle injuries during his career.

Before any of that happened, he had back injuries his rookie season. Despite two trips to the DL, he won ROY honors in 1978 as he hit 25 HRs and drove in 87 in 129 games while batting .327 and posting a npa OPS+ of 155.

1983 was his last year in Atlanta. He hit an amazing 44 HRs in only 114 games. IRL perspective, in 1983 Mike Schmidt led the Major leagues in HRs with 40. Schmidt played in 154 games. Dawson's 126 RBI in 114 games here, equals the ML best from 1983 posted by Jim Rice and Cecil Cooper who played 155 and 160 games, respectively. IRL, Dale Murphy, playing in the same Fulton County Stadium, hit 36 HRs and drove in 121 runs....in 162 games. This season, here, for Dawson is simply incredible. His na OPS+ for the year was 207.

In 1984 he signed with the Astros and played in an Astrodome that was a hitter's nightmare. Still, he hit 29 HRs in 109 games, there, and brought Houston a WS crown.

For his career, Dawson hit 411 HRs (46th) and drove in exactly 1400 runs (36th). Andre was an AS 4 times. His career slash line of 288/330/516 makes for a npa OPS+ of 135. Dawson also picked up 282 SBs in his career, and a GG in CF.

As previously mentioned, he enters on the Veteran Standard.

Black Ink: 19 (11)
Gray Ink: 127 (164)
HOFm: 94.5 (118)
HOFs: 49 (44)

Gorilla Composite: 3.2 (3.2) <---- Amazing, this

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Old 02-20-2013, 04:37 AM   #34
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Class of 2025 (1953), Hitters: Sandoval, Flick

In the previous HOF, the early entries had very had high scores and set the bar very high, early on. This resulted in the Standards being so high, that others didn't meet them and the Selection Committee using the Leader Boards, already, at this same class time. That has yet to happen here, but this is the last class that doesn't have a 5 year retirement wait. So, there will be no new eligible players entering the pool for 5 years. There are also some players previously eligible that now are not because they haven't been retired for 5 years. They will become eligible, again, when they have been retired for 5 years.

--------------------------

Kung Fu Panda is one of my newest favorite players IRL, and in OOTP. Heck, any player that enters his second HOF becomes an OOTP favorite. Sandoval is the 15th player to do that.

Pablo Sandoval was taken with the 5th overall pick in the 198 draft by the Giants. In what was a true surprise to me, he did not sign with his RL team. He opted to go back to the draft pool, and in 1999 the Red Sox took him with the 19th overall pick.

In his rookie season he won his first of 2 GGs at 1B. He did play 966 games at 3B in his career, but he played almost 1200 at 1B.

He broke into the league by cracking 236 (15th) base hits. Only 10 players have hit more, in a season. Of those hits, 49 were doubles and 37 were HRs. A slash line of 350/395/610 was good for a npa OPS+ of 156 and a Rookie of the Year trophy.


After the 2007 season, he signed a 5 yr $66M deal with the Indians. On a team that also had future HOFer Joey Votto, Sandoval paid immediate dividends and helped Cleveland hoist the WS trophy.

In his first 8 seasons, Sandoval hit at least 33 HRs a year. He hit 40 or more 4 times, including 3 straight 40+ HR seasons in 2004-2006.

For his career he collected 2670 hits (14th), 478 HRs (25th), and 1803 RBI (5th). His 565 career doubles ranks 11th. He is tied with his WS/HOF teammate Votto on the all-time doubles list.

His career line of 297/336/530 gives him a npa OPS+ of 129.

Sandoval appeared in 6 ASGs and won the MVP on 2002 when he hit 56 doubles (career high), 41 HRs and batted .330, which was good enough for him to garner the batting crown, also.

Sandoval retired following the 2016 season.

Kung Fu Panda enters on the basis of his Ink numbers and his HOFm number being above the Hall average.

Black Ink: 29
Gray Ink: 159
HOFm: 199.5
HOFs: 46

Gorilla Composite: 4.4

----------------------------

Elmer Flick becomes the 8th RL HOFer to join this shrine of immortals.

Drafted by the Cubs second overall in the 1982 draft, Flick won 2 MVPs and a WS for the Cubs. I really don't need to type anymore than that.....

In the 8 seasons from 1984 through 1991, Flick hit .300 every season. When we think of MVPs in the modern era, we usually think sluggers, but Flick's highest HR total came in 1984, a season in which he didn't win the MVP, when he hit 27.

In 1989, his second MVP season, he hit 22 HRs, but he only played 115 games, as he led the Cubs to WS glory. But, he had enough PAs to win the batting title by stroking a .338. He also was tops in slg% (.562) and OPS (.976, npa OPS+ a career high 188). His 5.6 WAR figure was also the league best (lots of stars struck by the injury bug).

In 1991 he joined a young future HOFer, Gary Sheffield, and Alex Serrano, a future HOFer in his Swan Song season, and celebrated as a World Champion with the Tigers, having joined them as a Free Agent in the previous off-season.

For his career, which ended following the 1997 season, Flick rapped 2295 hits. Of those 214 were HRs. He also had 96 triples in his career (8th) and stole 684 bases (9th). He scored 1305 runs (41st, 5 ahead of 42nd place holders, and HOFers, Ed Konetchy and Kevin Mitchell).

Flick was an AS 7 times, and won 4 GGs in RF as he slashed 309/379/474 for a career npa OPS+ of 138. Flick enters by virtue of his Black and Gray Ink scores being above the Hall average.

Black Ink: 24 (23)
Gray Ink: 160 (179)
HOFm: 148 (64)
HOFs: 49 (31)

Gorilla Composite: 3.9 (3.1)
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Old 02-20-2013, 06:28 AM   #35
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Class of 2025 (1953), Pitchers: Vazquez, Walsh

A neat thing about this HOF model is that you could take the same league results and run this method 100 times and get 100 different sets of players. You would get a core of 75%-80% of the Hall that would be in each of the 100 HOFs, and probably half of those not in 100% of the Halls would be in 90% of them. But the mix of the of the 200+ players would be different, for each.

If saying 100 out of 100 having different compositions is a stretch (and it may well be a stretch) the chances of having any 2 HOFs out of 100 where the same players are inducted in the same years is microscopically low.

-------------------------

Javier Vasquez was selected by the White Sox as the 13th overall pick in 2002. In a career that lasted through the 2019 season, Vazquez posted a record of 200-149 with an OOTP ERA of 4.08 (npa OPS+ 114). Vazquez is the first pitcher to be inducted with a career ERA over 4.00.

For his career, he received run support of 4.01 runs per game. How did he put up a career win% of .573 when he was charged with EARNED runs at a rate higher than he received TOTAL run support? My curiosity was quickly satisfied.

Vazquez pitched in 6 All-Star games from 2003-2012. In 2012 he pitched a no hitter and won his only WS as he led the Red Sox to the Championship. He is the first HOFer from that Boston team. He had a total of 10 days worth of injury time through 2012. In 2013 he suffered his first of 3 major injuries that each shelved him for 3 months. In two of these injuries he suffered recovery setbacks of at least a month. He was never the same pitcher agter 2012.

Up through 2012, he received average to very good run support. A good pitcher pitching well doesn't need that much support to get wins. AFter his injuries started, he wasn't pitching as well. In the last 6 seasons of his career he pitched at least 177 innings 4 times (the other 2 years he pitched a total of 126 2/3). His ERAs for those full seasons were 4.22, 4.84, 5.72, and a 6.59 in his final season.

Just as his pitching skills were leaving him, so did his run support. In his last 2 years he received run support of 3.37 and 3.25 runs per game. So, as he was racking up the earned runs that pushed his career ERA over 4.00, he was getting miserable run support that brought that career number below his career ERA.

But when he was good, he was very good.

From 2004-2012 he pitched over 225 innings a season and struck out over 200 batters in each season. In 2006 he won the CYA as he went 17-8 with an OOTP ERA of 3.48. He struck out 223 men while walking 38.

For his career he K'ed 2946 and walked 840. In 2014 (post injuries) he gave up 39 HRs. Only 4 players have given up more in a season and only one of them, Carl Hubbell, is in the HOF. Not that Vazquez was immune to the long ball before his injurues. His career gopher ball total of 384 is 7th most. HOFers Carl Hubbell and Steve Carlton are ahead of him on that list.

Vazquez won one GG. He enters the Hall on the basis of his Gray Ink number being above the Hall average.

Black Ink: 11
Gray Ink: 187
HOFm: 97.9
HOFs: 37

Gorilla Composite: 2.5

------------------------

At the age of 71. Ed Walsh becomes the oldest player to be inducted into this HOF.

Chosen by the Tigers as the 6th overall pick in 1974, Walsh played through the 1991 season and compiled a 191-144 record with an OOTP ERA of 2.93. That's good for an elite career npa ERA+ of 143.

A six time All Star, Walsh struck out 300 men 3 times as he racked up 2663 career Ks.

In his rookie season of 1975 (when quality pitchers were scarce and those that pitched were dominant), Walsh whiffed 380 men as he won 21 games vs 15 losses and posted an OOTP ERA of 1.92 (npa ERA+ 210).

Walsh never won a WS, but in three post-seasons he did his part to get his teams there. He made 4 post season starts, in 3 post seasons, throwing 34 innings, striking out 46 and walking only 5. His OOTP ERA in these games was 1.59.

In 1978 he won 28 games. Only 5 players have won more in a season. Of those, Matt Kilroy and Mike Moore preceded Walsh into the Hall.

Walsh is the 16th player to be inducted into this HOF and the previous one. His is the 9th RL HOFer to be inducted into this one. He is the 2nd RL HOFer to be inducted into both.

Walsh enters on the Veteran Standard.

Black Ink: 27 (67)
Gray Ink: 154 (178)
HOFm: 105 (146)
HOFs: 45 (52)

Gorilla Composite: 2.9 (4.4)

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Old 02-20-2013, 06:20 PM   #36
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Class of 2026 (1954): Bresnahan, Martinez, Belle

Roger Bresnahan was steal selection for the White Sox as a Supplemental First Rd pick (49th) in the 2000 draft.

In his rookie 2001 season he boasted an astounding npa OPS+ of 436!

OK, he started out as a pitcher in a DH league and got a hit in his only AB...but still, a good start!

Bresnahan, of course, enters this Hall for the same reason he is in the RL Hall (and is the 10th player to be inducted into both), he was a high quality offensive catcher.

Playing through the 2016 season, Bresnahan started playing catcher regularly in 2004. He slashed 286/400/425 in a career that saw him crack 1809 hits, steal 307 bases, score 1145 runs and draw 1107 walks to give him that OBP 114 points above his BA. His npa OPS+ for his career is solid HOF catcher number of 124. His RL OPS+ is a 126.

His OBP is 21st best, for a career, in league history.

Bresnahan is not just in for offense. He won 2 GGs as a catcher.

He also could pitch a little, too. In 2002 he notched 40 saves to finish second in the league. He had 59 career saves.

He was consistent from the regular season to the post season, as he also posted a .286 career post season average in 4 appearances, but he never won a WS.

A 5 time All Star, 4 times as a catcher, once as a pitcher, Bresnahan enters the HOF by virtue of his HOFs number being above the Hall average.

Black Ink: 3 (2)
Gray Ink: 52 (45)
HOFs: 107.5 (14)
HOFm: 57 (30)

Gorilla Composite: 2.4 (1.1)

---------------------------

Edgar Martinez had time run out on him before he could enter the previous HOF, having put up Hall-worthy numbers there, but his enshrinement was an apocalypse tragedy.

Martinez was selected by the Pirates with the second overall pick in 1991. He lost significant portions of a majority of seasons to injury. Nonetheless, by the time he called it quits in 2008, he had 2360 hits (44th), 543 doubles (17th), 314 HRs, 1235 RBI (74th), 1355 R (39th), and 1239 BB (28th) on his resume. All of these numbers are remarkably close to his RL totals.

Unlike RL, Edgar played third base for his entire career. He played more games at 3rd than any player in League history, 2163 games. He also has the most Total Chances and Assists at 3B in league history. He also picked up GG there.

Martinez was an 8 time All Star. He slashed 280/377/463 during his career for a npa OPS+ of 126. His slash numbers and OPS+ are significantly lower than in RL. That his stat totals, noted above, are so close to his RL totals is doubly amazing considering the rate differentials.

In 2003, with HOFer Camilo Pascual at the top of the rotation, Martinez helped lead the Mets to a WS victory.

Martinez, like Bresnahan, also enters by virtue of his HOFs number being above the Hall average.

Black Ink: 4 (20)
Gray Ink: 46 (107)
HOFm: 80 (132)
HOFs: 51 (50)

Gorilla Composite: 2.1 (3.4)

----------------------

If you hit 588 HRs, more than anyone not in the HOF, hitting a career high of 69 in a season and 50+ 4 times AND drove in more runs than anyone not in the HOF, and won the MVP twice, do you think you would have to wait until your 15th year of eligibility to enter the HOF? If your name is Albert Belle, maybe you should expect such a wait.

I did NOTHING except let the numbers fall where they did and the list bubble as it bubbled, and that is what happened. If I had chosen to do such a thing, it wouldn't be anywhere near as cool as it just happening.

You couldn't keep these numbers out forever, but I smiled every year he had to wait.

One thing I do wonder about, and this calls back to Jose Reyes being the All Time hit leader at the time of the inaugural class, is if there is a personality aspect to the ASG selection process. Reyes played in only 2.

Albert Belle played in 5 ASGs. Edgar Martinez (is there anyone, besides opposing pitchers, that doesn't like Edgar?) played in 8. Martinez had a career single season high npa OPS+ of 149. Belle had 6 seasons better than that.

Martinez had a career high of 36 HRs. Belle had 9 seasons of 36, or better.

They played as contemporaries.

Belle was taken as the 8th player overall in the 1991 draft by the White Sox. He retired in 2011. He slashed 288/357/568 for a career npa OPS+ of 144.

He won 2 WS titles for the Sox, then went to Cleveland and won a third there (interestng team selection).

The White Sox winning teams of 1994 and 1998 featured HOFer Matt Cain. The 1994 team also had HOFer Duke Snider.

In 1998, his one season with the Indians, Belle was still a feared hitter, at the age of 37. He popped 14 HRs in less than 100 games and carried a npa OPS+ of 120 for the campaign. Fellow HOFers Joey Votto and Kung Fu Panda were integral to that team's successful pursuit of the crown.

Belle collected 2381 hits in his career. He enters by virtue of his Gray Ink and HOFs numbers being above the Hall averages.

Black Ink: 16 (28)
Gray Ink: 146 (137)
HOFm: 139.5 (135)
HOFs: 53 (36)

Gorilla Composite: 3.6 (3.6)

NOTE: Applying this model to RL numbers, Albert Belle has a statistical record that is worthy of Cooperstown. Like over 90% of the RL voters, I never would have cast a ballot for him, either.

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Old 02-21-2013, 02:46 PM   #37
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Class of 2027 (1955) Hitters, Part 1: Kemp, Wheat

The RL Class of 1955 had 4 hitters and 2 pitchers inducted. So, it will be the same, here.

--------------------------------

Matt Kemp was a player in this universe who flashed brilliance when healthy, but had to fight through injuries throughout his career. The Selection Comittee looked favorably upon him and he gains a rather quick entry.

Kemp was drafted by the Rangers with the 24th pick in the 2001 draft. He made his final big league appearance in 2018, and he retired in 2019.

For his career he collected 1779 hits, 341 of which were HRs. He stole 212 bases and posted a career slash line of 278/329/484 for a npa OPS+ of 118.

When he was healthy, he was one of the best players of his era. In his sophomore season of 2003, he won the league MVP as he hit a career high 217 base hits, knocked 47 HRs, stole 29 bases, and drove in 149, leading the league in RBI. His slash line of 323/398/597 made for a npa OPS+ of 162. He played in 162 games. The only time in his career he was able to do so.

In 2007, he hit career highs of 57 HR and 162 RBI, leading the league in both categories. His 213 hits marked the second time he collected 200 in a season. It was also the last time. He slashed 320/362/623 in a non MVP effort that saw his npa OPS+ figure recorded as a 158.

Kemp played in 3 ASGs, and won 3 GGs in LF. He appeared in one post season, but never a WS.

Kemp enters by virtue of his Black Ink total being above the Hall average. Kemp was screened for the previous class, but his Black Ink was not above the Hall average, at that time. After the 2026 entrants arrived, it was, so he gets in with this class.

Black Ink: 22
Gray Ink: 61
HOFm: 96.5
HOFs: 22

Gorilla Composite: 2.3

----------------------------------

Zack Wheat is the 17th player to be inducted into this HOF and the previous one. He is the 11th RL HOFer to be inducted into this HOF. He is the third player to be inducted into all three. At age 79, he becomes the oldest player at his time of induction to enter the Hall.

Wheat was the 4th player drafted in the Inagural Draft in 1973. He was 26 years old. He retired following the 1986 season.

Selected by Cleveland, he played 5 seasons there before becoming a Free Agent and joining the Brewers following his 1977 campaign in which he hit .348 and won the league batting title.

In his first year as a Brewer, he again won the league batting title as he rapped out 217 hits (his second straight season over 200) and hit 29 HRs, drove in 126 and scored 120. He slashed 340/383/550 for a nap OPS+ of 160.

In 1980, he was part of a HOF stacked Brewer squad that won the WS. Previous entrants on that squad included Adrian Gonzalez, Count Campau, Ralph Branca, and Matt Kilroy.

For his career (again, which started at age 26) he collected 1651 hits, 225 HRs, stole 110 bases and slashed 317/375/512 for a solid HOF npa OPS+ of 149.

The entries of Wheat and Kemp illustrate how the HOF standards are relative to the universe from which they come, and not to that of their RL counterparts. Wheat enters, like Kemp, by virtue of his Black Ink being above this Hall's average, at this time. The RL Black Ink Average for hitters is 26. Both of them are below that figure.

In a league which began with 24 teams, and now has 32, Black Ink is harder to come by than when there were only 16 teams. It is to this lower standard that the players are compared for entry purposes.

Black Ink: 25 (8)
Gray Ink: 77 (227)
HOFm: 95 (98)
HOFs: 36 (48)

Gorilla Composite: 2.8 (3.2)

ADD: Zack Wheat had the highest GC for a LFer in the previous HOF. He won't have that distinction for this one.

Last edited by VanillaGorilla; 02-23-2013 at 05:42 PM. Reason: ADD
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Old 02-21-2013, 05:25 PM   #38
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Class of 2027 (1955) Hitters, Part 2: Pinson, Ewing

Vada Pinson is the 18th player to be inducted into this HOF and the previous one. Am holding my original guess that this total well end up to be about 50.

Pinson enters with a GC of 4.0167. The RL HOF average is a 4. Pinson's career, by this standard, represents what we would consider to be an "average" HOFer. However, if players are ranked ordinally based on GC, a GC of 4.0 would place that player in the second quintile. So, a 4.0 is "average" and "above average" at the same time.

Vada Pinson was taken as the 22nd pick in the 2002 draft by the Montreal Expos. In a ML career that ended following the 2021 season, Pinson collected 2623 hits (23rd), 543 doubles (18th), 394 HRs (61st), 1432 RBI (35th, tied with HOFer Steve Evans) and 1396 runs scored (33rd).

Pinson also stole 213 bases as he slashed 304/351/520 (npa OPS+ 134) for his career.

3 times he collected over 200 hits in a season. All three times he led the league in hits. In his sophomore season of 2004, at the age of 19, he collected 223 hits at a BA rate of .338 to win the league batting crown.

Pinson was 7 times an All Star. He won one GG.

7 times Pinson went to the post season. He batted .354 with 15 HRs and 52 RBI in 52 post season games. He appeared in one WS, but did not get a ring.

Pinson was a software selection, but in 2023, he did not enter on the First Ballot Screening. When the 5 year wait took effect for the previous class, Pinson was no longer eligible. This is his first season to be eligible since the implementation of the 5 year wait post retirement for induction.

Pinson enters on the basis of his HOFm and his HOFs numbers being above the Hall averages.

Black Ink: 21 (18)
Gray Ink: 129 (135)
HOFm: 174 (95)
HOFs: 59 (36)

Gorilla Composite: 4.0 (2.9)

---------------------------------

Buck Ewing is the 12th RL HOFer to be inducted here.

Selected by the Mets with the 10th pick overall in 1996, Ewing played through the 2013 season. For his career he rapped 2333 hits (49th), 480 doubles (32nd), and 288 HRs. He scored the same number of runs, 1272, as he drove in (53rd and 63rd).

Ewing stole 463 bases (in another Ewing career line oddity, his career slg% was .463), 445 as a catcher. This is the most SB for a career by a catcher.

In 2003 he led the league in both hits and RBI by posting respective career highs of 220 hits and 143 RBI. He drove in 100+ runs 5 times and scored 100+ runs 4 times. In 2003 he hit a career high 35 HRs, also. That season he lead the Mets to a WS victory. Fellow HOFers Edgar Martinez and Camilio Pascual were on that team.

In his Swan Song season of 2013, he made only 18 PAs. In the post season he got called upon to pinch hit 3 times. He got one hit, one walk, and scored twice as his Pirates won the championship. Nice way to go out.

Ewing enters on the basis of his HOFs number being above the Hall average.

Black Ink: 8 (5)
Gray Ink: 73 (97)
HOFm: 156.5 (35)
HOFs: 55 (38)

Gorilla Composite: 3.0 (1.8)


Ewing played 1856 games at catcher, 7th most in league history. He won 2 GGs as a catcher.
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Old 02-22-2013, 02:05 AM   #39
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Class of 2027 (1955), Pitchers: Verlander, Jenkins

There will be no more pitchers inducted until 2034 (1962). Quite unlike the previous HOF, there is a shortage of contenders for induction who are pitchers. Part of this is due to the era this league started. Part of this is due to the injury settings. I think the biggest part of it is the adjustment to the raw point totals in use here. Pitchers were getting a boost, compared to hitters, because the historical modifiers in use elevated their scores, in comparison to the hitters.

I don't see any hitting entries coming from the Leaderboards, anytime soon. Were it not for this seven year gap in pitching entries, we would have seen some for pitchers....and we still might.

-------------------------------

Arguably the best RL pitcher throwing today, Justin Verlander becomes immortalized in the converted tractor shed that is this HOF.

Verlander was selected by the Dodgers as the 10th overall pick in the 1986 draft. He retired following the 2005 season.

During this career that spanned 19 years, he racked up 251 wins (7th most) vs 167 losses. He posted an OOTP ERA of 3.56 which gave him a nice career npa OPS+ of 127. This number is a little high for comparison purposes as he pitched approx 95% of his innings as a member of the Dodgers and a member of the Royals.

Ballpark had nothing to do with getting guys to swing and miss. He struck out 3444 men (11th) in a little over 3800 IP.

Verlander was selected to 8 All Star teams. No SP in the Hall was named to more than 8.

Pitching in Kansas City, Verlander won back-to-back CYAs in 1994-95. In those seasons he was a combined 38-14 with a 3.17 OOTP ERA. Both seasons his npa ERA+ was 145. He struck out 528 and walked 129 in those two seasons.

He won 20 games twice in his career, lef the league in wins once, and led in strikeouts 3 times.

Why did it take him 22 years to garner induction. His detractors pointed to his post season record, where he was 12-12 with a 4.28 OOTP ERA. He went to the post season 8 times (7 times as a Royal). His Royals played in 4 WS and came up short, each time.

Verlander enters the Hall with both Ink numbers and his HOF, number above the current Hall averages.

Black Ink: 36
Gray Ink: 243
HOFm: 178.3
HOFs: 49

Gorilla Composite: 4.1

----------------------------------------

Fergie Jenkins becomes the 13th RL HOFer to be inducted here.

In 1990 he was selected 9th overall.....by the Yankees. Knowing that even in a parallel universe this just wasn't right, he refused to sign with them...my man!

In 1991, he was not drafted by the Cubs, but the Indians are the next best thing, so he went there as the 23rd overall selection.

He spent most of 1992 pitching in AAA. In 1993 he was shelved with injury for much of the season. In 1994 he was in the bigs to stay.

He posted a career mark of 210-135. His .609 win% is 29th All Time. He is 36th in strikeouts with 2732. He is tied for 31st on the win list with fellow HOFer Mike Moore. His career OOTP ERA is 3.84 which gives him a npa ERA+ of 123.

From 1994 through 1999, he was 93-61. In 1995 he was 17-8 in the regular season. In the post season, joined by future HOFers Jose B Reyes and Joey Votto, Jenkins won 5 post season games in 7 starts as the Tribe won it all.

In 2000 he went 9-18 with a 4.93 OOTP ERA and had a npa ERA+ below 100 for a full season for the first time. If there was a Comeback Player of the Year Award, Jenkins would have won it in 2001. But he will have to settle for the Cy Young, instead.

In 2001, Jenkins pitched the season of his life. He compiled a record of 22-4 and an OOTP ERA of 2.41. In 2001, that gets you an npa ERA+ of 191. In 265 IP, he struck out 251 men while walking only 32.

Jenkins was an AS 5 times. He enters the Hall by virtue of his Gray Ink number being above the Hall average.

Black Ink: 18 (36)
Gray Ink: 177 (206)
HOFm: 94.6 (132)
HOFs: 42 (53)

Gorilla Composite: 2.7 (3.7)

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Old 02-22-2013, 12:54 PM   #40
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Class of 2028 (1956): Bailey, Mantle

Ed Bailey was the first player chosen in 2000 draft. He found the offer of the Devil Rays to be lacking, so he opted to sit.

In 2001 the Red Sox spent the 11th overall pick on Bailey and made him a suitable offer. And they were glad that they did.

In 2002, Ed Bailey exploded into the league and hit 56 HRs and collected 148 RBI. He also hit 7 triples. He also got on base at a .390 clip and slugged .662 (that's an OPS of 1.052) for a npa OPS+ of 178. These numbers, all career highs, brought him ROY honors. He hit .302, but that would not be a career best.

That these were career highs in no way should suggest that he peeked early. Over his next two seasons he hit a combined 100 HRs, including 49 in only 139 games in his sophomore season.

He hit 452 HRs (44th) for his career. 450 of them came while playing catcher, the second most in league history.

He slashed 277/370/524 in a career that lasted through the 2017 season. This line made for an npa OPS+ of 140.

In six post seasons, Bailey hit 15 HRs in 145 ABs while batting .297. He made it to one WS, but lost.

A four time All Star, Bailey won two GGs as a catcher.

Bailey enters the Hall with his HOFm/s numbers both above the Hall average.

Black Ink: 14
Gray Ink: 81
HOFm: 201
HOFs: 56

Gorilla Composite: 3.6

-------------------------

In the most pleasant surprise of either HOF, Mickey Mantle finds his way in here. I had mentioned that probably 75-80% of the players who enter would enter each and every time if I ran the same league results 100 times, and that half of the remaining entries would probably get in at least 90% of the time. The remaining players, about 10%, would largely be "right place right time" types that had the stars align. Matt Kemp was one of those. Mickey Mantle is another.

Mantle, at age 83, is the oldest player to enter the Hall. His 45 year wait since retirement is the longest, yet, of any inductee.

Mickey Mantle was the third pick overall way back in the Inaugural Draft. He was selected by the Royals. The league started when he was 28 years-old.

Mantle was injured...a lot.

In fact, only one time did he play 140 games in the regular season. Only twice did he play more than 120. And only 4 times did he play in 100.

In spite of this, he won 2 MVPs, as a Royal. He played his entire career, from 1973-1982, as a Royal. Consider what KC Muni was like for baseball during this time period. Consider how few games Mantle played. Consider that no Royal in RL hit 35 HRs in a season. No Royal has hit more than 36 in a season, ever. No Royal has ever led the league in HRs.

Mantle twice hit over 36 HRs playing his home games in 1974 and 1977 KC and never playing more than 140 games.

In 1974 he hit 38 HRs (led the league) in 138 games. He slashed 307/421/596 for a npa OPS+ of 194.

In 1977 he played in 2 more games and hit 2 more HRs (just think if he would have played in 20 more!), 40 (2nd in the league), and slashed 309/443/602 for a npa OPS+ of 177.

In his first 9 seasons, his npa OPS+ was never below 130.

In these first 9 seasons he hit 218 HRs in 3057 ABs.

He played 100 games in 1982, but the injuries and age could no longer be warded off. He hit .207 in 343 ABs and hit just 9 HRs, and retired.

In 1979 he hit 32 HRs in 106 games. Playing with fellow future HOFer Tony Campana, Mantle and his Royals won the WS.

Mantle only played in 953 games. As he picked up 227 HRs in this short time span, he slashed 283/402/530 in freaking 70's-early 80's KC and had a npa OPS+ of 161.

I can make up the narrative of a Selection Committee honoring one of the hard luck heroes from the dawn of the league, and that works fine for me. As I see how the process actually works, it was HIGHLY unlikely that Mantle would get into this HOF. If I ran the process 100 times, this might be the only time he gets in.

I did nothing to coax the numbers, they fell as they fell, and he bubbled up when he bubbled up (more importantly, he didn't bubble up previous to now).

Mantle gets in by virtue of his Black Ink being above the current league average by the absolutely slimmest margin, ever (talking hundredths of a % point on the adjusted average).

But he is in...forever. I had no expectation of again having a Hall with Willie, Mickey, and the Duke...now, I am happily 2/3 there.

Mantle is the 19th player to be inducted into this HOF and the previous one. Is the 14th RL HOFer to be inducted here. He is the 4th RL player to be inducted into both OOTP Hall of Fame.

Black Ink: 21
Gray Ink: 60
HOFm: 72
HOFs: 34

Gorilla Composite: 2.4

Last edited by VanillaGorilla; 02-22-2013 at 02:31 PM.
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