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Old 01-30-2013, 03:36 AM   #1
VanillaGorilla
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Modeling OOTP HOF on RL HOF, Part 2

For the follow-up run though I started the universe in 1973. Since the Real HOF was opened in 1936 and voters were asked to consider players who had played since 1900, I gave this league the same 35 playing years before inaugurating the first class, in 2008.

Again I am using random debut of historical players with recalc and dev on. All development and aging modifiers are at the default.

The biggest setting difference is that this league I am using injuries on High.

Some interesting happenings in the early stages of the league are:

- Pitching is at a HUGE premium. Every team's minor league system is tied for first in SP prospects...because there are no SP in the minors (ghost players in use). Anyone that can start is in the major leagues. The aggregate league totals are dead on to the historical totals. This is a great illustration of just how OOTP works. I have said it before, and I will keep on saying it....this aspect of OOTP is simply genius. The pitchers that are in the game perform relative to the other pitchers in the game, and it is this relativity of talent application that allows the game to function as it does using all players from all eras in any environment. It is also key to the concept of the Hall of Fame (which is not represented well by OOTP, yet...). Those players that are exceptional among their peers are those that become stars, get big pay days, make All Star teams, win league statistical awards, win championships, and find their way into Cooperstown (or in this case, a converted Iowa tractor shed),

- Injuries are cumulative and when using the player dev engine and recalc, these cumulative injuries have an impact on player performance. Babe Ruth has played and retired. He was injured a LOT. Not only are his career totals down, but his rate numbers were that of a borderline HOFer, not the best player to ever play the game. The Ruth watch is on, only this time it is to see if he actually gets in the HOF. I will post about Ruth if he is removed from the spreadsheet of candidates for induction.

Currently there are 263 hitters in the spread sheet and 88 pitchers. This is a flip from the last league I ran where strong pitching came early. As noted, SP is at a huge premium. In the last amateur draft the first 9 picks were pitchers (one a RL HOFer). 2 HOF hitters were passed over by these 9 teams because pitching is so scarce, at this point.

As Casey used to say: And now, on with the countdown...
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Old 01-30-2013, 05:07 AM   #2
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Class of 2008 (1936), Hitters: Reyes, McGwire, Sheffield

For the Inaugural Class I again took the players who were retired that had the highest hit, HR, win, and K career totals. I went to the leaderboards in other categories to fill any empty slots left over.

-----------------------------------

I wondered how long it would take before I got a player who was in the previous HOF to be in this one. The answer was: not long at all. It also took zero time to get a RL active player enshrined.

Jose B Reyes is the All Time hits leader, with 3343, at the time of the HOF opening.

Reyes is also the career leader in triples with 177 and he holds the single season record of 28 from the 1979 season.

Reyes was chosen with the 8th pick in the 1976 draft by the Braves. 5 times he led the league in triples, and twice he led the league in runs scored. He scored 1665 runs in his career which is second best, all time.

4 times he collected 200 or more hits in a season, leading the league one time.

He split his career between 2B and SS, depending on team need, winning 2 GGs at SS. He stole 792 bases in his career, 3rd most.

In spite of being the all time hit leader and 4 times getting 200 hits and stealing all those bases and scoring all those runs, he only appeared on 2 All-Star teams. Perhaps there is a political aspect to the OOTP AS selection process, after all?

Reyes posted a career slash line of 296/331/418 for a npa OPS+ of 107. As OPS, and OPS+, places no value on speed, this number undervalues his offensive output. Though not his best OPS+ season, 1979 was the best for Reyes as he collected 217 hits, stole 95 bases, and scored 118 runs while slashing 294/331/438 (OPS+ 109).

Reyes is the career leader in AB with 11305. In a high injury environment, this actually means something. He is also the career leader in singles with 2547.

He won a WS in 1988 with the Reds and in 1995 with the Indians. He was named an honorary Ohio Player. Reyes retired following the 2001 season.

Black Ink: 20
Gray Ink: 127
HOFm: 197
HOFs: 55
Composite: 4.0

---------------------

Mark McGwire enters as the All-Time HR leader with 738. He hit a long ball at the amazing rate of one every 10.9 AB for his career. He was plauged by injuries, and retired at age 36.

Big Mac was selected by the Dodgers with the 7th pick in the 1986 draft. He appeared in 13 All-Star games. The delopment engine was kind to his glove as he also won 3 GGs at 1B.

In an amazing run, he won the league MVP 4 consecutive years, from 1991-1994. He hit a career high of 62 HRs (ironic) in 1993 and 1994.

He collected 2172 hits in his career (32nd), drove in 1797 (2nd) and scored 1559 (4th). He drew 1481 walks, second all time.

For his career he slashed 270/389/478 for a HOF elite npa OPS+ of 163, which is, ironically, his RL OPS+.

8 times he led the league in HRs. 4 times he led the league in RBI. He twice led the league in TB and R.

In 1994 he posted a slash line of 295/407/705 for a npa OPS+ of 192. In another bit of irony, he had perhaps his best season in 1998 when he batted .309 while hitting 52 HRs and walking a career high 147 times. He walked over 100 times in a season seven times.

From 1988 through the 200 season, he drove in 100 or more runs a year each season, despite missing time to injury. In all but one of those seasons he also scored 100 runs.

McGwire appeared in one WS, but did not win a title.

Black Ink: 74 (36)
Gray Ink: 183 (110)
HOFm: 343.5 (170)
HOFs: 52 (42)

Composite: 7.4 (4.1)

--------------------------

Gary Sheffield enters as the All-Time leader in G (2899), runs (2034), TB (5864), and RBI (2132). He is also the career VORP leader with a figure of 1132.1.

Selected by the Dodgers with the first pick overall in the 1984 draft, Sheffield played through the 2006 season. During his career, in which he slashed 299/387/544 (npa OPS+ 154), he hit the second most career HRs of anyone in league history, 694.

Sheffield appeared in 14 All-Star games, won the MVP in 1990, and picked up a GG at 3B. In that FA year of 1990, Sheffield hit 40 HRs, drove in 118, and scored 133 times while slashing 333/376/586 (npa OPS+ 168).

He signed as a Free Agent with the Tigers and led them to a WS title in 1991.

He hit a career high 52 HRs to lead the league (tied with McGwire), in 1998.

Black Ink: 30 (4)
Gray Ink: 249 (123)
HOFm: 309 (158)
HOFs: 71 (61)

Composite: 6.3 (3.3)

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Old 01-30-2013, 06:33 AM   #3
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Class of 2008 (1936), Pitchers: Cain, Davies

I have added the composite scores for the entrants (I am thinking I should call it the Gorilla Composite, since I invented it). 4.0 is the arithmetic mean for the real HOF. The median score score is around a 3.6. I think this (Gorilla) Composite gives a nice read on what type of career a player had in comparison to other great players by taking into account peak seasons, position played, longevity, and overall performance compared to his peers.

-------------------------------

Matt Cain enters as the career leader in wins. He posted a career record of 298-214 from 1981 through 2001. Though he only struck out 200 batters in a season once (an even 200 in 1984), Cain enters the HOF in 5th place on the all time K list with 3337 (vs 1376 walks).

Taken with the 5th overall pick by the Red Sox in the 1980 draft, Cain enters the Hall as the career leader in GS (681), IP (4794.2) and WAR (119.1). He also holds the mark for most hits surrendered (4610).

In 1986 he led the Red Sox to a 103 win season and a WS win. Ryan Garko was playing 1B.....

In that 1986 season he went 25-5 with an OOTP ERA of 2.69 (npa ERA+ 149) to win his first of 3 Cy Young Awards.

After having won with Red Sox, he went to the White Sox and won 2 more CYAs and two more WS.

He threw 25 shutouts in his career, 14th most all-time.

Cain appeared in 6 AS games.

Black Ink: 39
Gray Ink: 223
HOFm: 178.3
HOFs: 52

Gorilla Composite (yeah, I think I like the name): 3.9

--------------------------

George Davies struck out 3557 batters in a career which saw him throw just 3101.2 innings. He is second on the All-time K list (the leader is still active) and 8th on the All-Time K/9 list.

Davies enters the Hall with an amazing 225-114 record. There is no player with more than 92 wins with a higher career win%. His OOTP ERA of 2.67 in this environment is equally amazing. A career npa ERA+ of 167 is something I have never seen for a pitcher with 200+ wins.

Davies was the first overall selection in the 1986 draft by the Atlanta Braves.

A 7 time All-Star, Davies won 4 CYAs between 1991 and 2000. No longer the dominant pitcher he had been, Davies woon his first and only WS in his Swan Song season of 2004, with the Royals.

Davies struck out 300 batters in a season 5 times between 1990 and 2000. The most IP he logged in any of those seasons was 275. 4 times he posyed OOTP ERAs under 2.00. In 1992, he went 19-9 with an OOTP ERA of 1.74, striking out 309 while walking 60 in 264.2 IP. This was good for a npa ERA+ of 236...his second consecutive season with a nap ERA+ above 200. Yeah, he was dominant.

ADD: George Davies career ERA is the best of any pitcher with 10 years of service time.
ADD: Davies walked only 805 batters in his career to yield a 4.42 K/BB rate.

Black Ink: 59
Gray Ink: 212
HOFm: 218.1
HOFs: 60

Gorilla Composite: 5.0

---------------------------

On the HOFm for pitchers I have adjusted the point distribution for post season play. I am distributing the points equally over the entire play-offs, so a post season start is worth the same be it in the WS or LDS. This is resulting in fractional values and is why the HOFm numbers for pitchers are in decimals.

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Old 01-30-2013, 11:22 PM   #4
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I'll be following this one as well, and as closely as I followed the first. Thanks again for what will surely be another great thread.

I do have a question though... with your new format, starting in the 1970's, who were the "old guys" in your random debut pool? I never could figure out a way around having some great players who would never have a prime because they imported at 37... I had to restart my own historical project four times, twice because of losing Ruth, and the other Teddy Ballgame and Koufax... these guys, Jackie, and Clemente were the only guys I'd restart for, but there just didn't seem to be a workaround that wouldn't cost you some players in the prime or result in an uneven age distribution (which would of course bury other players as players would not retire in a "normal" fashion)...

Just curious... thanks again for all of your efforts, and now I will return to lurking.
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Old 01-31-2013, 12:17 AM   #5
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I will go back and post on the other thread for players that fit this categorization there.

For this league (just doing a quick eyeball check) HOFers, both RL and from the previous league, who entered as older players and did not put in 10 years of service include:

Maury Wills
Bert Blyleven
Pee Wee Reese
Bobby Mathews
Eddie Murray
Enos Slaughter
Old Hoss Radbourn
Ed Delahanty
Warren Cromartie
Brett Butler
Kevin Brown
Randy Johnson
Ted Williams
Tom Seaver
Harmon Killebrew
Joe Tinker
Rickie Weeks
Jimmy Collins*
Hank Aaron*

Though not in either HOF, Barry Bonds was also created as an older player for the inaugural draft.

I don't see this is any sort of problem with the Random Debut feature. Baseball has to start at some time, and when it does, not everyone is going to be 18 years old. Was there a Roy Hobbs born in 1831 that would have radically altered baseball history? We will never know.

As you can see by this quickly compiled list, you get a number of notable players that will debut as older players when you first create a random debut league. It is just how it is. There were a number of familiar names that are not HOFers in either world that came in as older players that I didn't list.

I get the idea of wanting to see a certain player play his entire career, but for the purposes of these leagues, I just let the players come in when they came in and roll from there. There are so many players of historical significance that you would wind up spending hours and hours redoing the initial player creation before you happened to get one that didn't contain any of them. And if you do that, guess what? Your initial pool is no longer random.

And as you noted, if the initial group of players all came in as rookies, you would mess up the progression of the league in the following years because there would be too much prime talent in the league and not enough spaces opening up for the new rookies joining. It would take maybe 20 years for this to sort itself out.

ADD: Rickie Weeks debuted as a 29 year-old, his 2012 season.

Last edited by VanillaGorilla; 02-03-2013 at 04:17 AM. Reason: * add to list
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Old 01-31-2013, 12:50 PM   #6
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Class of 2009 (1937): Carroll, Bennett, O'Neil

I had about a dozen hitters and a dozen pitchers that were inducted by the software to screen as First Balloters. None of them met the First Ballot Standard...that fact solidifies my opinion that the method used to choose the initial inductees is a sound one.

------------------------------------

Fred Carroll was a computer selection for having picked up 3003 hits in his career, 3rd most All-Time. With the induction of Carroll, the top 3 career hit leaders are in the HOF (Reyes, Sheffield). He joins the Hall on the basis of his HOFs number to be better than the average of the inaugural class.

Carroll, like the other 2 inductees of this class, played his RL baseball in the 1800s. Carroll has a strong record of stats from his playing days, so that the development engine saw fit to have him put up a HOF career. Carroll is a player I have used before and have hoped for great things, but this is the first time I have seen him have such a good career for so long.

He was selected by the Phillies as the 24th overall pick in the inaugural draft. He was labeled the #7 prospect on draft day. On Opening Day he was labeled #6.

During his career that lasted through the 1993 season, Carroll batted .291 while picking up his 3000+ hits. That he did this as a catcher, is even more amazing. And he is all over the catcher leaderboard. He is first in G and IP at the position. No one, active or retired, is within 400 GP or 4000 IP of his respective totals of 2311 and 20,030.

A 7 time All Star, Carroll hit 215 HRs, drove in 1479 (12th), and scored 1448 (8th).

His best year came in 1976 with the Phillies. He hit a career high 21 HRs and drove in 101 while slashing 305/387/470 for a npa OPS+ of 146.

For his career he slashed 291/379/427 for a npa OPS+ of 128 while never playing in a hitter friendly home ball park (The Vet, 3 River, The Murph, Astrodome, Olympic Stadium, and Busch).

He won a batting title in 1986, for the Pirates, batting .322 while getting on base at a .413 clip and slugging .493. He hit 13 HRs in 485 ABs that season.

Carroll appeared in 3 post seasons and 2 WS, but never won a championship.



Black Ink: 4
Gray Ink: 146
HOFm: 197.5
HOFs: 66

Gorilla Composite: 3.8

--------------------------------

Charlie Bennett is another guy that has given me nightmares when I play. If I sign him long term, he goes into the tank. If I trade him, he shines for 10 years. Well, I never had him on my team, this time around, and he becomes the second 19th Century catcher to join the Hall, this year. Go figure.

Bennett was taken second overall by the Rockies in 1992. He played all but his final (2007) season in Denver. Sure, this contributed to his offensive output...he hit 50+ HRs in three consecutive seasons from 1995-1997. But Denver didn't help him win 5 GGs at C, attain the highest ZF at C in league history, or steal 343 career bases.

From 1993 to 2001, Bennett hit 327 of his career 351 HRs. The injuries accumulated earlier in his career that he fought through had taken their toll, and he became a player that was shuttled from AAA (where he was an All Star) to the Majors as injuries dictated.

He appeared in 3 ML ASGs, and in 2000 brought a WS title to Denver as he scored 141 runs and drove in 123 while hitting 36 HRs, in the regular season. In the post season run, he hit 5 HRs in 41 AB over 14 games.

His 57 HRs in 1996 are the most in a season for a catcher. His 160 RBI in 1995 are also the most ever by a catcher in a season.

For his career Bennett slashed 284/383/515 for a npa OPS+ of 139.

Like Carroll, Bennett gets in by virtue of his HOFs number being above the Hall average.

ADD: Bennett becomes the first player inducted not selected by the software.

Black Ink: 18
Gray Ink: 116
HOFm: 209.5
HOFs: 59

Gorilla Composite: 4.1


----------------

"Who?" O'Niel? Hugh O'Niel. Yeah, I didn't know him either. Considering his ML career consisted of only 5 games in 1875, I am not sweating my lack of knowledge, on this one.

What Hugh O'Niel had in this universe, was off the charts Stuff and Control ratings that he maintained from the time he was drafted in 1979 until he retired in 1996 as the all time leader in saves with 513.

No relief specialist was inducted in the previous Hall, as the dynamics there worked severely against them. So many pitchers stayed healthy and put up good career numbers that it was very difficult for one to get in. In that league, 300 wins was not a ticket to the shrine.

What I do with pitchers, since the HOFs metric is not created to measure relievers, is I add 1 HOFs point for each 10 career saves for induction purposes. Once the pitcher is inducted, those points are removed and the calculations for the Hall on based on the HOFs number without the added bonus for career saves. This keeps the composite number in a comparable parallel to the RL HOF data while making entry for relief specialists possible without subjectively adding them. Even with this bonus, it will take a super freak occurrence for a RP to get in on the First Ballot standard, so the frequency of RP's entering should be rare, just as it is in RL.

O'Neil was dominant. Not only is he the career saves leader (he saved 30+ games 10 times, 40+3 times), he is the career leader in W/9 (0.82), WHIP (0.92), and opp OBP (.247). These numbers come from 1123 IP in 1049 appearances, all in relief.

A 4 time All Star, he was the league save leader 3 times. In 9 post seson games, he notched 6 saves and posted a 0.93 ERA, striking out 10 and walking 1. However, he never won a title.

His OOTP ERA of 3.17 results in a npa ERA+ of 150. For his career, he struck out 1405 while walking 102.

The Yankees picked him with the 147th pick. 130 players joined the draft that year. So, O'niel goes from being Mr. Irrelevant Plus 17 (due to players that hadn't signed in the previous year) to the HOF.

Hugh O'Neil...the Mother of All Sleepers.

Black Ink: 19
Gray Ink: 51
HOFm: 138.3
HOFs: 24

Gorilla Composite: 2.0

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Old 02-01-2013, 08:00 AM   #7
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Class of 2010 (1938): Hubbell

To err is human, but to really mess things up you need the help of a computer.

Going back over the previous HOF and my list of RL corresponding HOFers, I found that I had 5 more players in my HOF than I had on my list of RL HOFers.

I had not entered 2 RL hitters, Travis Jackson and Hank Aaron. Even though Jackson is a lower tier HOFer and brought down the average numbers, the absence of Aaron greatly outweighed Jacksons downward pull, and the Gray Ink and HOFm modifiers both increased a tick.

I applied the new modifiers to this HOF. With the Gorilla Composite scores rounded to the nearest 10th, for display purposes, none of them were altered.

I had also inadvertently placed a HOFer for Clark Griffith, who is listed on BBREF as a Pioneer/Executive entry. In my mind, I had always thought Griffith was entered for his playing record. Looking at it, I see that it is a fair call to make, so I added him to the calculations for the pitcher modifiers. Having far fewer pitchers in the Hall, a single entry has more influence on the averages there, and Griffith pulled down the Gray Ink and HOFm numbers a tick for the pitchers.

Fortunately, this change from the previous numbers had no impact on the selections already made, but they will be in use for the rest of this run through. There are players that got in, or did not get in, by some hundredths of a point in a category in the first run through. When a player gets in, or doesn't get in, this has a Butterfly Effect for the selection process going forward, and I want the numbers to be as true as I can humanly make them.

I did wind up, somehow, entering 2 more HOFers last time than I should have entered. I will be more careful with this one. If Lance Blankenship enters this HOF, too, I may have to go away for some commitment time.

------------------------------

Carl Hubbell, speaking of getting in by hundredths of a point on a metric, enters at this time by the slimmest of slim margins. After going through the previous inductees and comparing how things broke down with the old numbers vs the new and finding no impact (thankfully), Hubbell makes it in with the new modifiers, but only because the new modifiers were in place. That is how close the call was for him.

This is not to say that he wouldn't have found his way in with the next class of pitchers, or later on the Veteran Standard, but he would not have gotten in this year.

Carl Hubbell was selected 7th overall in 1978 by the Mariners. He spent 14 seasons pitching home games in that now obliterated band box known as The Kingdome, and put up amazing numbers considering the environment.

In those 14 seasons, he had only 2 with a npa ERA+ below 100, the low being a 92. In 1980 he made 22 starts, pitched 15 complete games, 3 shut outs, a league best(!) 2.18 OOTP ERA (npa ERA+ 185), struck out 144, walked 33, for a division winning squad that won 94 games.....and he had a 7-11 record to show for it.

For his career, Hubbell posted a record of 238-209 and an OOTP ERA of 3.57 (npa ERA+ 116). He ranks 7th on the All-Time Win list.

Hubbell gets in as a Blylevenesque entry. He holds the mark for giving up the most HRs in a career (430), but he struck out 3000+ hitters (3147, 6th). He tossed 30 (8th) shutouts and 154 (4th) CGs. 8 times he led the league in K/W ratio.

In spite of all of this, he made only 3 All Star squads.

At age 38, he managed to pick up 10 wins pitching in San Diego. He went 6-5 in the following 1995 season for the Mets, and called it a career.

Hubbell gets in by virtue of his Gray Ink number being above the current Hall average.

Black Ink: 26 (51)
Gray Ink: 199 (252)
HOFm: 78 (174)
HOFs: 41 (41)

Gorilla Composite: 2.9 (4.5)
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Old 02-01-2013, 02:24 PM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by VanillaGorilla View Post

I don't see this is any sort of problem with the Random Debut feature. Baseball has to start at some time, and when it does, not everyone is going to be 18 years old. Was there a Roy Hobbs born in 1831 that would have radically altered baseball history? We will never know.
Oh, I don't see it as any sort of problem either. I was more or less just curious who we wouldn't see, just in case we were looking. I always look for Ted Williams, for example...

Or, since you went through the database, you COULD import a guy or so every few seasons from that list if you PERSONALLY wanted to see a career.

Plus, this will save me pain in the thread knowing I won't see Teddy Ballgame come through. I will still enjoy it, but now I won't be sitting wondering when he will debut in this universe...

Thanks again for these projects, they are truly entertaining and informative!
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Old 02-01-2013, 06:42 PM   #9
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Gorilla Composite, Once in a Decade/Generation Players

Quote:
Originally Posted by jaysdailydose View Post
Or, since you went through the database, you COULD import a guy or so every few seasons from that list if you PERSONALLY wanted to see a career.
In the previous league, Ted Williams gained for me a valuable insight to how this game works. In the OOTP 14 release statement, Markus mentions the 'new' scouting where all scouts hit or miss on the same players. When I read that, I said out loud, "That is in already in the OOTP 13 scouting!" Because I saw Ted Williams, uninjured, bounce to three teams, in his prime, and never get a starting job...EVERY scout in the league pulled a big whiff on Ted. Because I show no favoritism to any player (and, yes, I have been tempted....), I can learn how the game works by letting it simply do its thing.

Sorry for you that Ted was an initial draft casualty of sorts, but judging by your emblem, I would have thought you would have been more happy not to see the likes of Kaline, Cobb, Gehringer, or ANY other Tiger that is in the HOF, on the list.

------------------------

Am coming into the Class of 2011. That will parallel the inductions of 1939, a big class, so this one may take a bit of time.

As the modifiers for the newly termed Gorilla Composite now reflect the actual RL HOF scores, the composite scores will be lower. With lower scores, there will be fewer 10+ scores, previously termed "Once in a Decade" scores.

In the RL HOF, using the modifiers now in use here (the new new ones), there are 6 players with GCs over 10: Ruth, Cobb, Musial, Hornsby, Williams, and Wagner.

Because of that, any player that puts together a 10+ GC score here will be labeled a "Once in a Generation" player.

The 7th player on the RL list is Hank Aaron with a 9.83.

Here is an interesting thought...let's say that over the next 20 years the writers and VC decline to induct any unrepentant player with direct ties to PEDs. No Bonds, Sosa, McGwire, Palmiero, Gonzalez, Clemens, etc....guys that would raise the bar of the RL HOF in terms of average Ink and HOFm/s averages. And let's say that over the next 20 years 20 players are inducted. I will say Maddux, Pedro, and Unit are gimmies....but let's say the others are the likes of my 9 true picks (Bagwell, Walker, Schilling, Franco, Piazza, Trammell, Murphy, Mattingly, Biggio) and guys like Whitaker, Hoffman, Rivera, Morris, Mark Grace (5 bucks says he is a VC induction), and others who lower the averages. What is really cool is that this arbitrary label of "Once in a Generation" player could, in a generation, apply to Hank Aaron if the hitting modifiers are brought down ever so slightly, as the result of the PED users being shunned from the Hall, by those who get inducted and thus elevate Aaron, numerically, to this standard.

This was long winded, I know, but now I think my favorite part of this whole exercise is the development of the Gorilla Composite, which is a completely unintended by-product of the HOF Induction algorithm (which I really like, too!).

ADD: I know McGwire is repentant, but I don't think he will get in. I am also aware that Piazza juice rumors led many writers to withhold votes from him as a 'wait and see' decision. These specifics I am not wanting to argue here, but just offering a plausible scenario where the next "Once in a Generation" HOF player, using GC, is Hank Aaron, even though he is from a past generation. I think that is cool.

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Old 02-02-2013, 02:41 AM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by VanillaGorilla View Post

Sorry for you that Ted was an initial draft casualty of sorts, but judging by your emblem, I would have thought you would have been more happy not to see the likes of Kaline, Cobb, Gehringer, or ANY other Tiger that is in the HOF, on the list.
I'm a native Detroiter, but a large portion of my ancestors imported into Boston after the boat, and all of my people talked about Teddy... and I've done a lot of research, college papers, etc about Ted...so he holds a special spot in my heart, but yes it would be a bummer to lose those Tigers, as well.

But, I don't want to derail your thread and get you off track. Thanks for such detailed responses, and once again for just doing these projects. Awesome work, and many thanks for spending so much of your time to do this and entertain/inform us all...
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Old 02-02-2013, 07:13 AM   #11
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Class of 2011(1939), Pitcher: Serrano

Making up for not having any relief specialists inducted in the previous HOF, the newest Shrine at The Field of Dreams welcomes it's second closer, Alex Serrano.

Yep, a for real "Cup of Coffee" RL player (1G, 1 IP), is inducted as a legitimate HOFer, here. Someone call Italy.

Unlike Hugh O'Neil, Serrano was not a sleeper. The Padres selected him with the 14th overall pick in 1976. He last pitched in 1991. During spring training of 1992, what would have been his 41 y/o season, Serrano tore his labrum and retired that October (he had signed a two year deal with the Tigers prior to the 1991 season).

Serrano is 2nd to O'Neil on the All-Time save list with 456. He led the league in saves in 1983 with 43. 7 times he saved 30 or more games. 4 times he saved 40 or more. In 1991, at the age of 40, he saved a career high 44 games and went out on top as the Tigers won the WS on a squad that also featured 24 y/o future HOFer Gary Sheffield.

That was the third WS win for Serrano, in 3 WS appearances with 3 different teams. He won in 1981 with the Padres, and in 1985 with the Phillies.

In Post season play, Serrano had no peer. In 14 games he was 2-0 with 9 saves in 9 attempts and had a 0.66 OOTP ERA.

From 1977 through 1982, he had just one season with an OOTP ERA above 2.00, and that was 2.02 figure in 1980. In 1979, he was 7-1 with an OOTP ERA of 0.86 in 63 IP. He collected 24 saves that year. His npa ERA+? 478.

For his career, he posted an OOTP ERA of 2.20 (npa ERA+ 209) while piecing together a record of 72-58 in 982 1/3 IP over 882 games.

Serrano, with the bonus for career saves, gets in by virtue of his HOFs number being above the Hall average.

ADD: Serrano was named to 9 AS teams. That is the most of any pitcher currently in the Hall.

Black Ink: 3
Gray Ink: 46
HOFm: 159.5
HOFs: 25

Gorilla Composite: 1.8

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Old 02-03-2013, 05:54 AM   #12
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Class of 2011 (1939) Hitters, Part 1: Snider, Campau, McKean

Duke Snider is the first in a group of firsts to join the HOF.

He is the first player, exception for the inaugural class, obviously, to get in during his first year of eligibility. He is also the first player to get in on the First Ballot Standard. He is the first player to join this HOF who is a member of the RL HOF. He is also the first member of the previous Random Debut Inaugural Class to be inducted here.

Snider was taken by the Mets with the 7th overall pick in 1987. He did not sign with them and the next year was drafted by the White Sox with the 6th overall pick. He immediately rewarded them by hitting .283 with 34 HRs and en route to Rookie of the Year honors.

For his career, Snider hit 661 HRS (3rd, behind McGwire and Sheffield), 1789 RBI (3rd, behind Sheffield and McGwire), scored 1572 runs (4th, but ahead of McGwire) while collecting 2480 hits (12th) in 8266 ABs for a career BA of .29991 (but I am calling it .300 for points purposes...have decided to take the rounding as displayed on the Player Page for the sake of efficiency).

His career .590 slg% is 10th All-Time and his .385 OBP is 45th. These numbers gave him a career npa OPS+ of 161.

Twice Snider won the league MVP. In 1991 he hit 55 HRs while batting .331. In 1993 he hit a career best 68 HRs to lead the league and again take MVP honors. His slash line of 322/386/687 was good for a full season career best OPS+ of 191.

The following year he ruptured a tendon in his finger in April and missed 4 months due to that. He spent 2 more weeks on the DL with a knee injury in September. By the time the Play-offs rolled around, he was healthy and eager to play.

In the play-offs he led the White Sox to their first WS title on a squad that had a 34 y/o Matt Cain (Inaugural HOFer) anchoring the rotation. In 72 post season ABs, Snider went deep TWELVE times, slashing 347/385/875. He was a monster in the post season. In 1996 (a non title year), his AB/HR ratio was even better as he it 9 HRs in 53 ABs.

In 2002 he led the Royals to WS victory on a squad that had the other Inaugural Class HOF pitcher, George Davies, in his final season.

Snider was a 6 time All-Star.

In 1996 he scored what is still a league record 161 runs.

He enters the Hall as the batter with the most career strikeouts, 1979.

Black Ink: 35 (28)
Gray Ink: 139 (183)
HOFm: 251 (152)
HOFs: 72 (47)

Gorilla Composite: 5.4 (4.2)

----------------------------

Count Campau is a historic first. He is the first player to be inducted in this HOF, or the previous HOF, or the RL HOF who played the majority of his games as a DH. He was also the first player taken in the 1973 Inaugural Draft.

He had just over 10 years of ML service time, and was therefore eligible for this Hall. I was surprised when he got in, here, but after looking more closely at his career, he was quite amazing while he played. The software missed him. My casual observation missed him, but the algorithm did not. He gets in by virtue of his Gray Ink numbers being above the Hall average. This is truly remarkable for a player with such a short career.

Chosen by the A's as the first player to be drafted in league history, a 26 year-old Count Campau proved their scouts correct as he picked up ROY honors by hitting .305 with 31 HRs and stealing 48 bases and scoring 110 runs in 1973. Two years later, in 1975, he hit 35 HRs, drove in 101, scored 127, and stole 38 bases to win the MVP. He won the league batting crown as he slashed 330/390/545 for a npa OPS+ of 163.

In 1975 he hit 35 HRs and drove in 95 in only 114 games. The 180 npa OPS+ from that season was his career best.

For his career he hit 248 HRs as he collected 1648 hits and stole 245 bases. His career slash line of 306/368/493 made for a npa OPS+ of 141. He never played his home games in a hitter friendly park.

He was part of the 1980 Brewers team that has won it's second of three consecutive division titles in 1980 when they won the WS. He is the first player inducted from this team, but he will not be the last.

He played 140, or more games in a season 7 times. He hit 30 or more HRs in a season 6 times. Campau was an 8 time All-Star.

Black Ink: 19
Gray Ink: 152
HOFm: 120
HOFs: 28

Gorilla Composite: 3.1

-----------------------------

Ed McKean was the 14th player selected in the 1973 Inaugural Draft. Chosen by the Braves, he played 12 years with them before leaving for the White Sox and ending his career as a Met in 1987.

McKean is the first player to be inducted into this HOF on the Veteran Standard.

During his career he collected 2087 hits and an even 100 HRs. He enters the Hall with the highest career batting average of anyone eligible for the Hall, a .327 average which is currently 4th best, All-Time.

He got on base at a .387 clip, which is 37th best All-Time. Gary Sheffield holds the 38th spot. Adding a slugging % of .445, McKean had a career npa OPS+ of 134.

A 6 time All-Star, McKean was on 3 division winners, one pennant winner, but was not on a WS winner.

He won consecutive batting titles in 1981 and 1982. In '82 he had a career high BA of .365.

Black Ink: 15 (4)
Gray Ink: 100 (104)
HOFm: 111.5 (69)
HOFs: 48 (46)

Gorilla Composite: 3.0 (2.2)

Last edited by VanillaGorilla; 02-03-2013 at 06:45 AM.
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Old 02-03-2013, 09:21 AM   #13
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Class of 2011 (1939), Hitters, Part 2: Gonzalez, Melton, Evans

Adrian Gonzalez joins Duke Snider and Jose Reyes as the third player to be inducted in this HOF and the one from the previous league.

Gonzalez was selected in the 2nd rd (pick 29) of the inaugural draft by the Cardinals, at age 25. He retired following the 1991 season at age 43.

For his career, Gonzalez collected 2409 hits (15th), 465 HRs (17th), and drove in 1487 runs (12th). His career slash line of 292/378/516 yielded a npa OPS+ of 151.

A two time MVP, Gonzalez appeared in 8 ASGs and won one GG. 4 times he led the league in OPS.

He won his second MVP award in 1982 as an Expo. Playing home games in the cavernous restricted flight zone of Olympic Stadium, he belted 34 HRs in only 121 games. A slash line of 333/404/627 produced a npa OPS+ of 190! To put that in RL context, in 1982, Gary Carter had his best OPS+ season, a 142. Playing in 154 games for the Expos, he was the team leader in HRs with 29.

Gonzalez played on the WS Champion Brewers of 1980 with Count Campau. I said there would be more HOFers from that team in Campau's write up. That still holds true, there will be more.

In that 1980 post season, Gonzalez hit 4 HRs in 42 ABs slashing a nasty 333/463/643.

Gonzalez joins Ed McKean as the second player to enter on the Veteran Standard.

Black Ink: 13
Gray Ink: 119
HOFm: 104
HOFs: 46

Gorilla Composite: 2.9

-------------------

Bill Melton was taken in the third rd of the Inaugural Draft by...who?...the St Louis Cardinals. Yep, HOFers picked back to back in the inaugural draft by the same team. Will wait and see if their first rd pick finds his way in...it is a toss up, on that one.

Melton, selected as a 22 y/o, played until the age of 44 before retiring in 1995. In those years he he rapped 2659 base hits and belted 478 HRs while slashing 263/350/447 for a npa OPS+ of 124.

Melton was named to the All-Star team 11 times. In 1984, playing for the Padres in the year they moved in the fences (that Game 5 NLCS HR would have been a long out in 1983, Steve Garvey!), he hit 42 HRs in 139 games. In comparison, in 1983, Melton hit 25 HRs in 131 games.

Melton is this world's Ernie Banks, as he has the most HRs for anyone who never played in the post season. To play 19 years in the divisional era and to contribute as much as he did, and not get one whiff of the post season is really amazing. Then again, in 10 big league seasons during the divison era, the real Bill Melton never saw a post season game, either. This sim can be amazing.....

Melton enters the HOF by virtue of his HOFs number being above the Hall average.

Black Ink: 6 (4)
Gray Ink: 101 (24)
HOFm: 90.5 (11)
HOFs: 53 (15)

Gorilla Composite: 2.6

--------------------------

Steve Evans rounds out this mega-class. The final inductee of 2011 enters the HOF as the career leader in doubles with 636. No player is within 50 of this mark, and no active player is within 100.

Evans was taken by the Brewers with the 4th overall pick in 1985. He did not come to terms with them and found him self drafted by the Ragers as the second pick in the following draft.

Evans hit .362 with 19 HRs in 106 games for Texas and took home the ROY trophy in 1987.

After 7 years in Texas, went to the Braves and played 12 seasons there. In 2006 he finished his career with a stop in Oakland.

Evans had 2824 hits for his career, 4th all time. The top 5 players in career hits are all in the HOF. He scored 1590 runs, 3rd all time. The top 5 players in career runs are also all in the HOF. He hit 341 career HRs...that is 52nd best. His 1432 RBIs does place him 17th on that career ledger.

Six times an All Star, Evans appeared in 2 WS, but fell short of victory.

Black Ink: 8 (6)
Gray Ink: 90 (55)
HOFm: 114.5 (8)
HOFs: 61 (11)

Gorilla Composite: 2.9
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Old 02-03-2013, 10:46 AM   #14
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Two Timers

I am using this post to document players who have been inducted into this HOF and in the first run through.

The player's numbers from the first HOF are listed first.

The format is: Black/Gray/HOFm/HOFs:GC.

An asterisk denotes RL HOFers.

This post will be updated as needed.

Jose B Reyes

41/167/207/45 : 5.0
20/127/97/55 : 4.0

Duke Snider*

21/226/80/59 : 4.0
35/139/251/72 : 5.4

Adrian Gonzalez

8/151/75.5/37 : 2.6
13/119/104/46 : 2.9

Al Rosen

25/125/128.5/53 : 4.1
14/115/188/64 : 3.9

Jim Wynn

31/201/88.5/58 : 4.3
27/111/144.5/58 : 3.9

Jeff Bagwell

13/166/69.5/38 : 2.8
13/152/142.5/41 : 3.3

Ted Simmons

22/284/277.5/73 : 6.0
19/122/268.5/74 : 4.8

Camilo Pascual

8/152/88/38 : 2.2
46/182/151.5/41 : 3.7

Tex Hughson

34/225/184.5/38 : 3.8
40/158/92/37 : 3.0

Matt Kilroy

32/150/140/37 : 3.1
35/145/149.9/48 : 3.4

Larry Doyle

27/174/226/74 : 5.1
11/106/110/52 : 2.9

Mark Baldwin

67/259/177.5/46 : 4.8
14/150/131.1/37 :2.6

Al Pratt

67/292/154/57 : 5.1
47/196/149.5/38 : 3.7

Jimmy Walsh

33/189/200/55 : 5.0
3/104/207.5/68 : 3.6

Pablo Sandoval

16/158/108/38 : 3.1
29/159/199.5/46 :4.4

Ed Walsh*

17/202/72/34 : 2.5
27/154/105/45 : 2.9

Zack Wheat*

61/228/341/68 : 7.5
25/77/95/36 : 2.8

Vada Pinson

27/226/144/51 : 4.5
21/129/174/59 : 4.0

Mickey Mantle*

76/351/493/85 : 10.2
21/60/72/34 : 2.4

Pete Rose Sr

16/168/93.5/48 : 3.3
12/76/96.5/52 : 2.7

Gavvy Cravath

44/176/93.5/35 : 4.2
29/166/252/65 : 5.2

George Sisler*

58/157/201.5/38 : 5.3
40/149/225/51 : 5.0

Ty Cobb*

151/432/597.5/85 : 14.3
77/218/442/77 : 8.9

Keith Hernandez

12/245/164.5/55 : 4.3
10/204/222/63 : 4.5

Darryl Kile

9/200/130/35 : 2.7
14/129/95/41 : 2.4

Walter Johnson*

74/358/274.5/69 : 6.6
75/339/244.8/60 : 6.1

Sandy Koufax*

59/369/335/69 : 6.6
18/149/106.5/40 : 2.6

Nap Lajoie*

90/381/335/56 : 9.3
35/142/236/58 : 5.0

Pedro Martinez

92/289/223.5/58 : 6.2
70/267/220/57 : 5.5

Dave Parker

47/195/158.5/36 : 4.8
14/108/164/58 : 3.5

Ted Kluszewski

55/215/313/56 : 6.7
23/83/145.5/40 : 3.3

Bobby Bonds

47/354/236.5/65 : 7.0
15/111/167/46 : 3.3

Pud Galvin*

52/190/129.5/36 : 3.7
41/145/74.1/25 : 2.7

Rusty Staub

14/166/147.5/61 :3.9
24/197/278/74 : 5.6

Ken Griffey Jr

112/326/455/74 :10.9
13/159/215/63 : 4.3

Rod Carew*

32/208/182/45 : 4.7
10/112/186.5/63 : 3.7

Bill Delancey

0/23/107/34 : 1.6
0/6/101.5/50 : 1.8

Honus Wagner*

58/386/423.5/86 : 9.3
12/100/139.5/74 : 3.6

Hank Thompson

12/221/276/72 : 5.2
11/126/167/58 : 3.5

Buddy Bell

13/180/116.5/49 : 3.4
7/87/129.5/55 : 2.9

Johnny Mize*

30/221/305/65 : 5.9
14/108/145/52 : 3.3

Dan Casey

25/211/104/38 : 3.0
9/171/96/34 : 2.3

Rogers Hornsby*

127/405/636.5/89 :13.5
110/270/637.5/76 : 11.7

Ron Blomberg

10/139/183.5/54 : 3.6
29/77/163.5/43 : 3.6

Eddie Collins*

57/246/418/80 : 8.2
37/169/319.5/79 :6.3

Cliff Johnson

3/85/144.5/50 : 2.7
1/91/155.5/57 : 2.8

King Kelly*

23/208/177.5/57 : 4.6
7/77/161/47 : 2.8

Charlie J Ferguson

191/466/221/87 : 9.9
106/301/280.3/63 : 7.0

Shoeless Joe Jackson

169/403/546.5/84 : 14.4
92/228/446.5/77 : 9.5

Bob Gibson*

17/203/152.5/52 : 3.4
15/177/149.1/45 : 3.0

Last edited by VanillaGorilla; 04-14-2013 at 01:22 AM. Reason: Gibson
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Old 02-05-2013, 06:10 AM   #15
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Thoughts Approaching the 2013 Season

I posted an update at this time for the previous HOF where I noted that 300+ game winner David Wells, the newest inductee in that Hall, was 15th on the All-Time win list, there.

Here, I have yet to have one 300 game winner. There are only 5 pitchers here that have won 250 games (Matt Cain, the all time leader with 298, is the only one inducted, so far). The active player with the most wins is a RL HOFer with 214 after 17 seasons of play. The main causes of this differential might be attributed to the eras in which the two leagues respectively began and the use of a High injury setting setting here.

I noted the other league seemed to have generated a large number of RL HOF and RL potential HOF, and otherwise notable pitchers, early on. This may be a contributing factor, as well.

Though fewer seasons have been played here prior to the opening of the Hall, about the same number of players have entered into the draft pools. This is due to this league starting with 24 teams.
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Old 02-05-2013, 08:59 AM   #16
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Class of 2014 (1942): Zwilling

Dutch Zwilling was having a HOF career in the previous league, but that world came to an end before he had a shot at induction. Here he gets in on the First Ballot Standard as a true first balloter, joining Duke Snider as the only inductees not part of the Inaugural Class to be so honored.

Zwilling was the second player taken in the 1996 draft, by the Chicago Cubs.

Playing in 162 games, his rookie season, he hit a league record (since bested) 248 hits while batting a league record .391 (since bested), hit a league record 70 HRs (since bested) and slugging a league record (later bested by Zwilling himself) .792. Carrying what would turn out to be a career best OBP of .467 gave him a npa OPS+ of 230 for the season and the Triple Crown. Yeah, he won Rookie of the Year. He also won the first of his 4 league MVP awards that year. His WAR for that season was an 18.4. That is the best single season in league history.

At the time of his induction, Zwilling has the best career WAR (120.1) of anyone in league history. His .333 career batting average is 4th best all time, and the highest of any HOF eligible player. His .713 career slg% is second best all time, and that is also the best of any HOF eligible player.

Following his rookie campaign, due to injuries, Zwilling managed to play in 150 games in a season only once before retiring in 2013 at the age of 36.

In 2004 he slugged what is still a league record .853 in 117 games. In those 117 games he hit 65 HRs as he posted a career best 233 npa OPS+. In a completely astonishing feat, in just these 117 games, Zwilling collected the second of his two career Triple Crowns.

Injuries limited him to 1485 games in his 17 year career. In that am\mount of time he collected 1879 hits. Of those hits, an amazing 583 of them were HRs, 7th most all time.

His career slash line of 333/405/713 yields a stunning npa OPS+ 194.

Zwilling won 4 batting titles, was an 8 time AS and won 6 GGs in CF. He went to the play-offs three times, but never reached the WS. In post season play, he was a monster. In 17 games, he slashed 433/500/1060. He hit 13 HRs in only 67 post season ABs.

ADD: That Zwilling played in 150 games only twice, it is complete amazing that he led the league in Total Bases 4 times, HR 5 times, RBI 3 times, R 3 times, and WAR 5 times. As a BTW, he had 260 career SBs.

Black Ink: 73
Gray Ink: 148
HOFm: 282.5
HOFs: 68

Gorilla Composite: 7.0

Last edited by VanillaGorilla; 02-05-2013 at 09:34 AM. Reason: ADD
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Old 02-05-2013, 09:17 AM   #17
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HOF 2 Chart

With the induction of Dutch Zwilling, the Gorilla Composite mean score of the inductees is 3.998. The expected mean is 4.000.

With the actual mean being right on the expected mean, at this time, I made a chart to get a visual on how this is plotting out.

The plots from left to right represent the GC for each player inducted in the order each was inducted. This order is the same in which they are listed in this thread. So, even though it is true that the first 5 entries came at the same time, Jose B Reyes happens to be first on the chart, as he was written up first in this thread. Mark McGwire is represented by the second plot, etc.

The sixth plot is Fred Carroll who, with a 3.773 GC represents the median placeholder, at this time. It is expected that the median score will remain lower than the mean scores. If this reverses, this will be a freak occurrence of astronomical mathematical improbability. We do NOT expect to see a normal distribution with this data (ie Bell Curve).

We see the floor being constructed around the 3 line. Whether this remains the case, or it gets broken, is to be seen.
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Old 02-06-2013, 12:54 PM   #18
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Class of 2017 (1945), Part 1: Cash, Yastrzemski, Lapp

9 hitters enter this year. This is the last class that does not have a 1 year retirement minimum.

-------------------------------

Norm Cash finishes his career 2nd on the All Time HR list, to Mark McGwire, with 722 HRs. That gives us a 1-2 combo of a juicer and a corker. However, neither was actually caught and any disparaging comments are nothing but jealous hate, so there will be no more such remarks....ever....really.....

Using the best interwoven carbon fiber / maple wood composite pseudo titanium bats that could be clandestinely procured in the 21st Century black marketplace, Norm Cash made a career out of making baseballs fly just a little bit farther than you thought they would from 1997 through 2016.

The fifth player taken overall in the 1996 draft, by the Pirates, Cash put himself near the top of the career list in all major hitting categories.

Along the way to his 722 HRs, he collected 2663 hits (9th), scored 1788 runs (2nd), and drove in 1957 (2nd). He played in 2560 games (11th), walked 1438 times (6th) and enters the Hall 3rd on the career WAR and VORP lists.

A 12 time All-Star, Cash drove in 100+ runs in 12 consecutive seasons from 2000 through 2011. He scored 100 runs, or more, 10 times in those 12 seasons while never hitting fewer than 34 HRs in a season.

Twice he led the league in HRs, including his 2000 season when he hit 59 while slashing 333/482/724 for a npa OPS+ of 216. In 2010 he hit a career high 65 HRs for a 2nd place league finish.

Cash had a career slash line 297/402/590 is good for a 165 npa OPS+

Cash only appeared in one post season, in 2014. Past his prime, he played in 6 games for Tampa Bay as they won the LDS, but lost the LCS. Cash didn't contribute anything to the cause...literally.....he was 0-for-19...THAT was good for a MINUS 37 npa OPS+.

In spite of this, and his 1896 career strikeouts (4th), Cash enters the Hall as First Ballot inductee on the First Ballot Standard.

Black Ink: 15 (7)
Gray Ink: 210 (104)
HOFm: 268 (50)
HOFs: 66 (29)

Gorilla Composite: 5.1 (1.9)

-------------------------

Carl Yastrzemski is the second of two players to be entered on their first year of eligibility via the First Ballot Standard.

Taken as the second player in the 1994 draft by the Marlins, Yastrzemski retired in 2016 with 2732 hits (5th), 538 HRs (14th), 1809 RBI (3rd), and 1624 runs scored (5th) in 2623 games played (6th).

His career slash line of 297/389/543 made for a npa OPS+ of 150. His 588 career doubles place him 4th on that career list.

He hit .318 with 29 HRs to win ROY honors in 1995.

In 2000 he won the league MVP by 51 HRs (his first of 3 consecutive 50 HR seasons), driving in and scoring league bests of 159 and 145, respectively, while collecting a league high 213 hits. His slash line of 344/458/672 made for a npa OPS+ of 196. In 2001 and 2002 he hap npa OPS+ scores over 200, but 2000 was his only MVP. All of these seasons were played as a Marlin.

He never saw the post season in a Marlins uniform. His only two post season appearances came in 2015 as an Oriole and in 2016 as a Brave. He never reached a WS.

Yaz appeared in 7 All-Star Games.

Black Ink: 28 (55)
Gray Ink: 156 (206)
HOFm: 211 (215)
HOFs: 62 (60)

Gorilla Composite: 4.8 (6.1)

-----------------------

Jack Lapp becomes the third player to enter the Hall on the Veteran Standard.

Lapp was drafted as the 10th player overall in the 1980 draft by the Reds. Playing through the 1997 season, he collected 2135 hits (his 2062 as a C is 4th most All Time) and slashed 291/378/409 for a career npa OPS+ of 123.

Lapp was a 5 time All Star.

In 1988 he won the WS with the reds as a 29 year-old along side a 29 year-old Jose B Reyes. Lapp's 311/412/411 line was superior to that of the eventual career hit leader and his VORP for that season of 40.7 was superior to Reyes' 36.4. Lapp retired following the 1997 season.

Black Ink: 6
Gray Ink: 96
HOFm: 144.5
HOFs: 43

Gorilla Composite: 2.7

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Old 02-07-2013, 11:12 AM   #19
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Class of 2017 (1945), Part 2 : Ruth, Rosen, McGriff

The Babe Ruth watch is over. He is inducted into the HOF. This is an entry of much interest, but for reasons that are quite unexpected.

At the age of 22, Ruth was taken in the Inaugural Draft for the season in which he would turn 23. He was selected in the ELEVENTH round...that's the 244th over all pick....by the Cleveland Indians.

Did the AI have a heads-up that Ruth was not be so Ruthian?

Anyone who enters the HOF had a great career. I don't care who you might think is the least deserving player in the HOF, that player had a great career, period.

Ruth had an injury plagued career. 12 times he had injuries/setbacks of at least 4 weeks. Throw in a couple "viral infection"s and a "dehydration" for uncanny realism, and you have a guy that is in the HOF, but is also a guy that some writers (largely large asthmatics) say doesn't belong.

Ruth hit 499 career HRs before retiring in 1989. Falling one short of the magic 500 number, he was NOT a software inductee.

These injuries he suffered throughout his career seem to have a cumulative carry over from season to season that is not negated by the recalc. Cool!

Ruth was a 5 time AS, won 2 GGs, and an MVP. Ruth also had a career batting average of .226, the lowest in the Hall for a hitter, and probably will remain that way through the Class of 2085.

In 1980, playing in Philadelphia's Veterans Stadium, Ruth hit a career high .275. He also hit a career high 62 HRs, a career high 133 RBI, a career high 116 runs scored and a slash line, which all contained figures were career highs, of 275/380/718 (npa OPS+ 194). He did all of this in just 126 games. That was enough time to win the MVP.

Putting this season in RL perspective, in 1980 Mike Schmidt had perhaps his finest season, also playing in The Vet. He hit .286 with 48 HRs in 150 games. Ruth's season here, in this 1980 Philly environment, is nothing short of amazing.

Similar to Dutch Zwilling, Ruth only had 2 seasons in which he played 150 games. However, he led the league in HRs 5 times. His career slash line of 226/341/533 is good for a npa OPS+ of 143. This number is very Hall-worthy, but it is not a number of Ruthian proportions.

Ruth ranks 15th on the All-Time HR list at the time of his induction. His 1246 RBI place him 48th. His 1330 hits doesn't make the top 100.

Ruth won a WS in 1985 with the Phillies. HOF Alex Serrano was the closer on that team.

He retired following the 1988 season.

Ruth gets in by virtue of his Black Ink number being above the Hall average.

Black Ink: 34 (171)
Gray Ink: 130 (414)
HOFm: 130 (464)
HOFs: 36 (113)

Gorilla Composite: 3.8 (14.6)

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Al Rosen becomes the 4th player to be entered in this HOF and the previous HOF.

Al Rosen was taken by the Angels with the third overall pick in the 1993 draft. In 1993, his 20 year career came to end. He had cracked 2558 hits (15th), 586 HRs (8th), drove in 1743 RBI (9th), and scored 1648 runs (4th) before hanging up the spikes.

In 1999, he a career best, and league leading 68 HRs and drove in a career best 183 runs. Slashing 325/404/728 for a npa OPS+ of 184, Rosen won the League MVP.

In 1997 he played in 162 games, hit .305 with 49 HRs and led the Angels to WS victory.

For his career, Rosen slashed 269/369/507 (npa OPS+ 132). Along with his 1999 MVP, Rosen was an 8 time AS, and won 3 GGs at 3B.

Rosen's HOFm and HOFs numbers both exceed the Hall averages.

Black Ink: 14 (23)
Gray Ink: 115 (97)
HOFm: 188 (82)
HOFs: 64 (28)

Gorilla Composite: 3.9 (2.6)

---------------------------

When the scouts miss, they can all miss at once (this will not be a new feature in OOTP 14...it's already here!).

A 22 year-old Fred McGriff was taken in the 23rd rd of the inaugural draft...number 533, overall. The ChiSox got a supreme steal, here.

Playing from the inaugural 1973 season through 1990, the Crime Dog ripped 2519 hits (17th), 539 HRs (13th, one more than Yaz), drove in 1594 (11th), and scored 1422 (20th).

An 11 time All-Star, this former 23rd rd pick won 3 MVPs in his career. He also picked up a GG along the way.

However, the White Sox didn't seem to realize what they had, as they traded McGriff to the Mets prior to the 1974 season for John Cangelosi. Winning a WS with the Mets in 1975, a still developing McGriff slashed 296/366/396 in 99 games. He was traded in 1976 to the Cardinals for Jimmy Sheckard.

McGriff signed a couple one year deals with St Louis. After 3 straight 40+ Hr seasons, he went back to the Mets for a six year contract, at age 29. As a second go around Met, he won the MVP in 1981 and 1983, again hitting 40+ HRs each time and posting a npa OPS+ above 170 each of those seasons.

He left the Mets for a 2 year deal in Houston following the 1985 season. In 1986, he won his 3rd MVP as he hit 43 HRs and posted a npa OPS+ of 173 in the Astrodome. His career single season best HR total was 46. He hit 40+ HR 9 times.

McGriff had a career slash line of 298/382/532 for a npa OPS+ of 155.

McGriff did not get in on his First Ballot screening. However, at the time of his entry, his numbers in all four categories are above the current Hall averages, which would have made him a First balloter had this been his first year of eligibility.

Black Ink: 40 (9)
Gray Ink: 241 (105)
HOFm: 223.5 (100)
HOFs: 53 (48)

Gorilla Composite: 5.7 (2.7)

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Old 02-07-2013, 04:34 PM   #20
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Class of 2017 (1945) Part 3: Campana, Wynn, Bagwell

This group of inductees is my favorite thus far. A current player who developed into a true star, and a couple of personal favorites who make repeat inductions. Sweet.

-------------------------------

Tony Campana has put up amazing RL SB% numbers in his first 2 RL seasons. Though OOTP 13 just has real data from 2011, I figure Campana to have a frequency of kind treatment from the dev engine in 14.

Tony Campana streaks into the HOF as the All-Time leader in stolen bases. His career total of 1163 (vs 408 CS) is more than 250 more than what the second place holder has. It is also over 500 more than the leader among active players. This mark will be his for a whle.

8 times Campana stole 90 or more bases. 4 of those times he broke the 100 mark. He led the league in stolen bases 7 straight seasons from 1978 through 1984.

A second rd draft pick of the Royals in 1976, Campana played in the Majors through the 1995 season. He picked up 2655 hits (12th) and scored 1478 runs (also 12th). His 566 doubles places him 6th on that All-Time list. No eligible with more doubles is not in the HOF.

He drew 1002 walks (49th) to put together a career slash line of 279/346/406 (npa OPS+ 110). Twice Campana led the league in hits, with a career high of 218 in 1979.

In that 1979 season, Campana stole a career high 119 bases. He scored 115 times and drove in 102 as he led the Royals to WS victory.

A six time All-Star, Campana won 2 GGs in LF. He enters the Hall by virte of his Black Ink total being above the Hall average.

Black Ink: 36
Gray Ink: 125
HOFm: 119.5
HOFs: 38

Gorilla Composite: 3.8 (yep, Tony Campana has a higher GC than Babe Ruth....would not have bet on that)

----------------------

As I mentioned in his induction post in the previous league, Jimmy Wynn has always held a special place in my baseball fan heart. I am thrilled that he makes a return trip to the HOF.

Jimmy Wynn was the 10th player taken in the 1983, selected by the Red Sox.

Twice he led the league in HRs as he clouted 447 career bombs (26th).

8 times an All-Star, Wynn had his best season in 1989 when he hit 52 HRs, and scored 134. He drove in the same figure, 134. He slashed 303/418/605 for a npa OPS+ of 195.

A rarity of the day, Wynn played his entire career with the Red Sox and retired in 1999. There he won 2 WS (1986, 1990...again, Ryan Garko was playing 1B in 1986). Matt Cain was the anchor of a fine Boston rotation in 1986.

For his career, Wynn slashed 284/384/515 of a npa OPS+ of 146. He also had 232 career SB. His 1440 career R is 18th most, all time. His 1354 RBI is 32nd most. He struck out 1612 times to hold down the 20th spot on that list.

Wynn's Black Ink and HOFs numbers exceeded the Hall averages.

Black Ink: 27 (4)
Gray Ink: 111 (94)
HOFm: 144.5 (36)
HOFs: 58 (30)

Gorilla Composite: 3.9 (1.6)

-------------------------

Jeff Bagwell is another pleasant repeat customer for me. I think he has been jobbed out of RL HOF induction, thus far, but he is getting his due, here.

Bagwell was selected by the Yankees with the second overall pick in 1988. He came to Washington and played for the Nationals in their first season in town, in 2005. That would be his last season of ML play.

For his career, he collected 2149 hits (58th) and clubbed 423 HRs (30th). His 1340 RBI are 34th most all-time.

While the career numbers are nice, Bagwell was one of the most feared players of his day. A 7 time All-Star, Bagwell twice was league MVP (1992 and 1994). He drove in 100 runs every single year in the 90s.

He made the post season 3 times, appeared in one WS, but never won a title.

In 1994 he hit a career high 47 HR while batting .314. He also scored a career best 137 runs as he drove in 119.

His career slash line of 287/374/512 gives him a npa OPS+ of 141.

Bagwell enters the Hall by virtue of his Gray Ink number being above the Hall average.

Black Ink: 13 (24)
Gray Ink: 152 (157)
HOFm: 142.5 (150)
HOFs: 41 (59)

Gorilla Composite: 3.3 (4.2)
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