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PT Dynasty Reports Tell us about your very own Perfect Team!

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Old 05-10-2019, 01:28 PM   #1
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The Re-Themed "Chandler Memorials"

I've chosen a new theme for the Chandler Electrics, using players ONLY from 1950 and before. One thing I've learned which I will implement next version, is to limit myself to some kind of subset from the entire PT player database from the beginning. Allowing yourself use of the entire player list will accelerate you to Perfect Level, and ALSO require you to spend additional monies if you wish to actually win at that level.

Using a subset limits your choices, increases the difficulty, slows down your advance, and keeps more money in your pocket Even though next year's teams may spend a little, it will likely be limited to $10 a month (12,000 PPs). That's no more than $120 for the year and none of it all at once. That investment plus APs will be another restriction on me to build slower.

Next year my teams will be...

Chandler Memorials - Players prior to 1951. $10 per month investment maximum.

I thought it would be interesting to see if a team consisting of only early ballplayers could compete - and at what level. My limited investment will obviously mean I won't be able to buy the best players in this grouping, but that's ok since I don't feel compelled to reach Perfect Level. I've re-themed my current Chandler team so I can play this concept for the rest of this version as well.

Pontiac Starchiefs - Players 1947-1971. $10 per month investment maximum.

I picked this range of years specifically from my birth year to the year I got married. This is when I loved baseball to a fault, and was always disappointed because my parents wouldn't let me try to develop by high school baseball talent. This team will have all the players I loved to watch as a kid and young man.

Seattle Pilots - LIVE players only. Free-2-Play

It wouldn't be right not to play with the current LIVE players, so this team will allow me to do that. I picked the Seattle Pilots name because I don't expect to play any better than they did, 64-98, lol.

- - -

It's unlikely any of these teams will reach Perfect Level, and will thus be more fun to play with no more than $240 spent for the year. As other's have said, there's a thousand ways to play this game - you just have to find which is most enjoyable to you.

Getting started with my new Chandler Memorials, I thought I would introduce the team one position at a time. I've got the teams pretty much chosen and am currently training a couple players out of position and testing some theories on using pitchers that are basically all starters.

PS: I've also added real photos to the baseball cards I use in the Dynasty reports. I wish I could use them in the game...

First up; the Catchers

Walker Cooper - William Walker Cooper (January 8, 1915 – April 11, 1991) was a catcher in Major League Baseball who played for six National League teams from 1940 to 1957. He was known as one of the top catchers in baseball during the 1940s and early 1950s. His elder brother Mort, a right-handed pitcher, was a three-time 20-game winner and three-time NL All-Star.

Ernie Lomabardi - Ernesto Natali Lombardi (April 6, 1908 – September 26, 1977), was a catcher for the Brooklyn Robins, Cincinnati Reds, Boston Braves, and New York Giants during a career that spanned 17 years, from 1931 through 1947. He had several nicknames, including "Schnozz", "Lumbago", "Bocci", "The Cyrano of the Iron Mask" and "Lom". He was inducted into the National Baseball Hall of Fame in 1986. Baseball writer Bill James called Lombardi "the slowest man to ever play major league baseball well." The fact that he was so slow spoke to what an outstanding hitter he was. Lombardi was an All-Star for seven seasons, he hit over .300 for ten seasons and finished his major league career with a .306 batting average despite infields playing very deep for the sloth-like baserunner. He is listed at 6'3" and 230 lbs, but he probably approached 300 lbs towards the end of his career. He was also known as a gentle giant, and this made him hugely popular among Cincinnati fans.

Next up; First Basemen...
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Old 05-10-2019, 02:47 PM   #2
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I love love love love theme teams. Cannot wait to see the rest of the players!
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Old 05-10-2019, 03:04 PM   #3
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Magus978 View Post
I love love love love theme teams. Cannot wait to see the rest of the players!
Three weeks ago I started with a couple of F2P-teams - the Frankenthal Brewers (obviously exclusively with Brewers players) and the Frankenthal Retros (with players before 1990) ... and I have to admit I have a lot more fun with them than with my "regular" team
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Old 05-10-2019, 03:53 PM   #4
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The First Basemen

Lou Gehrig - Henry Louis Gehrig (born Heinrich Ludwig Gehrig; June 19, 1903 – June 2, 1941), nicknamed "The Iron Horse", was a first baseman who played his entire professional career for the New York Yankees. Gehrig was renowned for his prowess as a hitter and for his durability, which earned him his nickname "The Iron Horse." He was an All-Star seven consecutive times, a Triple Crown winner once, an American League (AL) Most Valuable Player twice, and a member of six World Series champion teams. He had a career .340 batting average, .632 slugging average, and a .447 on base average. He hit 493 home runs and had 1,995 runs batted in (RBI). In 1939 he was elected to the Baseball Hall of Fame and was the first MLB player to have his uniform number (4) retired by a team.

Johnny Mize - John Robert Mize (January 7, 1913 – June 2, 1993), nicknamed Big Jawn and The Big Cat, was a first baseman for 15 seasons between 1936 and 1953, losing three seasons to military service during World War II. Mize was a ten-time All-Star who played for the St. Louis Cardinals, New York Giants, and the New York Yankees. During his tenure with the Yankees, the team won five consecutive World Series. Mize retired in 1953 with 359 career home runs and a .312 batting average. He served as a radio commentator, scout and coach in the major leagues after he retired as a player. He was selected for induction to the Baseball Hall of Fame by the Veterans Committee in 1981. In 2014, he was inducted into the St. Louis Cardinals Hall of Fame Museum.

High Pockets Kelly - George Lange Kelly (September 10, 1895 – October 13, 1984), nicknamed "Long George" and "High Pockets", was a first baseman that played most of his MLB career for the New York Giants (1915–1917, 1919–1926), but also played for the Pittsburgh Pirates (1917), Cincinnati Reds (1927–1930), Chicago Cubs (1930), and Brooklyn Dodgers (1932). Kelly was a two-time World Series champion (1921 and 1922). He led the National League in home runs once (1921) and runs batted in twice (1920 and 1924), and was elected to the Baseball Hall of Fame in 1973.

Next up; Second Basemen...
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Old 05-10-2019, 04:19 PM   #5
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The Second Basemen

Charlie Gehringer - Charles Leonard Gehringer (May 11, 1903 – January 21, 1993), nicknamed "The Mechanical Man", was a second baseman, coach, general manager, and team vice president, who played for the Detroit Tigers, for 19 seasons (1924–1942). He was elected to the Baseball Hall of Fame, in 1949.

Joe Gordon - Joseph Lowell Gordon (February 18, 1915 – April 14, 1978), nicknamed "Flash" in reference to the comic-book character Flash Gordon, was a second baseman, coach and manager who played for the New York Yankees and Cleveland Indians from 1938 to 1950. He was inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame in 2009. Gordon was the outstanding player at his position during the 1940s, winning the 1942 American League MVP Award and being named to The Sporting News Major League All-Star Team in nine of his eleven seasons. Known for his acrobatic defense, he led the AL in assists four times and in double plays three times. He was the first AL second baseman to hit 20 home runs in a season, doing so seven times, is second all-time for career HRs at second base (246) behind Robinson Canσ, and he held the single-season record until 2001.

Bobby Doerr - Robert Pershing Doerr (April 7, 1918 – November 13, 2017) was a second baseman and coach. He played his entire 14-year Major League Baseball (MLB) career for the Boston Red Sox (1937–51). A nine-time MLB All-Star, Doerr batted over .300 three times, drove in more than 100 runs six times, and set Red Sox team records in several statistical categories despite missing one season due to military service during World War II. He was inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame in 1986. After he retired as a player, Doerr served as a scout and a coach; he worked with Carl Yastrzemski before his Triple Crown season. From April 25, 2017, until his death on November 13 of that year, Doerr was the oldest living former major league player.

Next up; Third Basemen...
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Old 05-10-2019, 05:50 PM   #6
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The Third Basemen


Ken Keltner - Kenneth Frederick Keltner (October 31, 1916 – December 12, 1991) was a third baseman with the Cleveland Indians, until his final season when he played 13 games for the Boston Red Sox. He batted and threw right-handed. A seven-time All-Star, Keltner is notable for being one of the best fielding third basemen in the 1940s and for helping to end Joe DiMaggio's 56-game hitting streak on July 17, 1941.

Bob Elliott - Robert Irving Elliott (November 26, 1916 – May 4, 1966) was a right fielder who played most of his career with the Pittsburgh Pirates and Boston Braves. He also briefly managed and coached in the Majors. Born in San Francisco, California, the right-handed batting and throwing Elliott stood 6 feet tall and weighed 185 pounds. Elliott contributed some of the happiest memories to the Braves' final Boston years, winning the 1947 National League Most Valuable Player Award and earning the nickname "Mr. Team." The following season, his power hitting helped lift Boston to its second National League pennant of the 20th century, the team's first in 34 years, and last before relocating to Milwaukee. He was the second Major League third baseman to have five seasons of 100 runs batted in, joining Pie Traynor, and retired with the highest career slugging percentage (.440) of any NL third baseman. He also led the National League in assists three times and in putouts and double plays twice each, and ended his career among the NL leaders in games (8th, 1262), assists (7th, 2547), total chances (10th, 4113) and double plays (4th, 231) at third base.

Next up; Shortstops...
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Old 05-10-2019, 05:58 PM   #7
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The Shortstops

Dick Bartell - Richard William Bartell (November 22, 1907 – August 4, 1995), nicknamed "Rowdy Richard", was a shortstop in Major League Baseball (MLB). One of the most ferocious competitors of his era, he won both admirers and critics at each stop during a career which saw him traded every few seasons, often under acrimonious circumstances. While hitting .300 over a full season five times, he led the National League in double plays four times and in putouts and assists three times each. From 1927 through 1946, Bartell played for the Pittsburgh Pirates (1927–30), Philadelphia Phillies (1931–34), New York Giants (1935–38, 1941), Chicago Cubs (1939) and Detroit Tigers (1940–1941). With an aggressive style of play and fiery attitude which earned him his nickname, Bartell was a competent shortstop with good hands and a strong throwing arm. A skillful hitter, he batted a career-high .320 in 1930. After three seasons over .300 with Pittsburgh, he was traded to the Phillies in 1931, and had collected seasons of 40 doubles and 100 runs three times each by 1934. Bartell helped Philadelphia's perennial cellar-dwellers finish in fourth place in the 1932 season, for the only first-division finish by a Phillies team in a span of 32 seasons (1918–42). In 1933 he was elected to the first All-Star Game, and again in 1937.

Joe Cronin - Joseph Edward Cronin (October 12, 1906 – September 7, 1984) was a shortstop, manager and general manager. He also served as president of the American League (AL) for 14 years. During his 20-year playing career (1926–1945), Cronin played for three teams, primarily the Boston Red Sox; he was a player-manager for 13 seasons (1933–1945), and served as manager for two additional seasons (1946–1947). A seven-time All-Star, Cronin became the first AL player to become an All-Star with two teams; he was elected to the Baseball Hall of Fame in 1956.

Next up; Left Field...
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Old 05-10-2019, 06:19 PM   #8
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The Left Fielders

(Weakest position on the team)

Jesse Burkett - Jesse Cail Burkett (December 4, 1868 – May 27, 1953), nicknamed "Crab", was a left fielder from 1890 to 1905. He batted over .400 twice. In 1895, he batted .405 and led the NL in batting average and hits (225). The following season, he set a career-high in batting average, at .410, and led the league in batting average, hits (240), and runs scored (160). Burkett was the second player in major league history to bat over .400 twice, the first being Ed Delahanty. After his playing career, Burkett managed in the minor leagues. He was elected into the Baseball Hall of Fame in 1946.

Hoot Evers - Walter Arthur "Hoot" Evers (February 8, 1921 – January 25, 1991) was an outfielder who played twelve seasons in the major leagues with the Detroit Tigers (1941, 1946–1952, 1954), Boston Red Sox (1952–1954), New York Giants (1954), Baltimore Orioles (1954, 1956), and Cleveland Indians (1955–1956). Evers' best season was 1950 when he led the American League in triples (11) and was among the American League leaders in most batting categories. That year, he had a .551 slugging percentage (3rd in the AL behind Joe DiMaggio), 34 doubles (4th in the AL), .959 OPS (4th in the AL), 67 extra base hits (6th in the AL), .323 batting average (7th in the AL), 109 RBIs (9th in the AL), 259 total bases (9th in the AL), and .408 on-base percentage (10th in the AL).

Joe DiMaggio - Joseph Paul DiMaggio[a] (November 25, 1914 – March 8, 1999), nicknamed "Joltin' Joe" and "The Yankee Clipper", was an American baseball center fielder who played his entire 13-year career in Major League Baseball for the New York Yankees. Born to Italian immigrants in California, he is widely considered one of the greatest baseball players of all time, and is perhaps best known for his 56-game hitting streak (May 15 – July 16, 1941), a record that still stands. This, however, is his rookie card.

Next up; Center Field...
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Old 05-10-2019, 07:48 PM   #9
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The Center Fielders

Pete Reiser - Harold Patrick Reiser (March 17, 1919 – October 25, 1981), nicknamed "Pistol Pete", was an outfielder and coach, who played during the 1940s and early 1950s. In 1941, his first season as a regular starter, Reiser helped the Dodgers win the pennant for the first time since 1920. He was a sensation that year, winning the National League batting title while leading the league in doubles, triples, runs scored and slugging percentage. He was also named a starter to the All-Star team and placed second in MVP balloting. While known primarily for his time with the Brooklyn Dodgers, Reiser later played for the Boston Braves, Pittsburgh Pirates, and Cleveland Indians.

Andy Pafko - Andrew Pafko (February 25, 1921 – October 8, 2013) played for the Chicago Cubs (1943–51), Brooklyn Dodgers (1951–52), and Milwaukee Braves (1953–59). He batted and threw right-handed and played center field. In his 17-year MLB career, he was an All-Star for four seasons and was a .285 hitter with 213 home runs and 976 RBI in 1852 games. In 1999, he was named to the Chicago Cubs All-Century Team.

Dom DiMaggio - Dominic Paul DiMaggio (February 12, 1917 – May 8, 2009), nicknamed "The Little Professor", was a center fielder. He played his entire 11-year baseball career for the Boston Red Sox (1940–1953). He was the youngest of three brothers who each became major league center fielders, the others being Joe and Vince. In both 1941 and 1942 he scored over 100 runs to finish third in the AL, and was among the league's top ten players in doubles and steals; he was named an All-Star both years.

Next up; Right Field...
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Old 05-10-2019, 07:58 PM   #10
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I just realized the unique card designs with ACTUAL PLAYER LIKENESS!!! I wish the OOTP team had the rights to put these likenesses in the game

Also, I have Pafko for my main team. Too prone to big slumps. Has disappeared when my team has needed him most, so he's probably gone on Sunday as I shift gears to a more OBP-oriented team.
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Old 05-10-2019, 08:01 PM   #11
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The Right Fielders

Sam Crawford - Samuel Earl Crawford (April 18, 1880 – June 15, 1968), nicknamed "Wahoo Sam", was an outfielder for the Cincinnati Reds and Detroit Tigers from 1899 to 1917. He was elected to the Baseball Hall of Fame in 1957. Crawford batted and threw left-handed, stood 6 ft 0 in tall and weighed 190 pounds. He was one of the greatest sluggers of the dead-ball era and still holds the Major League records for triples in a career (309) and inside-the-park home runs in a season (12). He has the second best all-time record for most inside-the-park home runs in a career (51). He finished his career with 2,961 hits and a .309 batting average, and became the first player to lead both the American League and National League in home runs (1901 and 1908).

Ted Williams - Theodore Samuel Williams (August 30, 1918 – July 5, 2002) was an American professional baseball player and manager. He played his entire 19-year Major League Baseball (MLB) career as a left fielder for the Boston Red Sox from 1939 to 1960; his career was interrupted only by mandatory military service during World War II and the Korean War. Nicknamed "The Kid," "The Splendid Splinter," "Teddy Ballgame," and "The Thumper," Williams is regarded as one of the greatest players in baseball history. Williams was a nineteen-time All-Star, a two-time recipient of the American League (AL) Most Valuable Player Award, a six-time AL batting champion, and a two-time Triple Crown winner. He finished his playing career with a .344 batting average, 521 home runs, and a .482 on-base percentage, the highest of all time. His career batting average is the highest of any MLB player whose career was played primarily in the live-ball era, and ranks tied for 7th all-time (with Billy Hamilton). This is his rookie card.

Willard Marshall - Willard Warren Marshall (February 8, 1921 – November 5, 2000) was a right fielder in Major League Baseball. From 1942 through 1955, Marshall played for the New York Giants (1942, 1946–1949), Boston Braves (1952[start]), Cincinnati Reds (1952[end]-1953) and Chicago White Sox (1954–1955). He batted left-handed and threw right-handed. In an 11-season career, Marshall posted a .274 batting average with 130 home runs and 604 RBI in 1246 games played. In 1947 he tied a NL record at the time by hitting three home runs in one game. In 1951 he became the 2nd outfielder in the history of baseball to play an entire season without an error.

Next up; The Pitchers...
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Old 05-10-2019, 08:36 PM   #12
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I like seeing the older player pictures whenever I click onto yours or Stl jason's dynasty teams. I'm glad you guys take the time to do that. Keep up the good work
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Old 05-11-2019, 12:31 PM   #13
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The Pitchers

Dizzy Dean - Jay Hanna "Dizzy" Dean (January 16, 1910 – July 17, 1974), also known as Jerome Herman Dean, was a baseball pitcher who played for the St. Louis Cardinals, Chicago Cubs, and St. Louis Browns. A brash and colorful personality, he was the last National League (NL) pitcher to win 30 games in one season (1934). After his playing career, “Ol’ Diz” became a popular television sports commentator. Dean was elected to the Baseball Hall of Fame in 1953. When the Cardinals reopened the team Hall of Fame in 2014, Dean was inducted among the inaugural class.

Red Faber - Urban Clarence "Red" Faber (September 6, 1888 – September 25, 1976) was a right-handed pitcher who played from 1914 through 1933, playing his entire career for the Chicago White Sox. He was a member of the 1919 team but was not involved in the Black Sox scandal because he missed the World Series due to injury and illness. Faber won 254 games over his 20-year career, a total which ranked 17th-highest in history upon his retirement. At the time of his retirement, he was the last legal spitballer in the American League. Faber was inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame in 1964.

Bob Feller - Robert William Andrew Feller (November 3, 1918 – December 15, 2010), nicknamed "The Heater from Van Meter", "Bullet Bob", and "Rapid Robert", was a baseball pitcher who played 18 seasons in Major League Baseball (MLB) for the Cleveland Indians. Feller pitched from 1936 to 1941 and from 1945 to 1956, interrupted only by a four-year engagement in the Navy. In a career spanning 570 games, Feller pitched 3,827 innings and posted a win–loss record of 266–162, with 279 complete games, 44 shutouts, and a 3.25 ERA. Baseball Hall of Fame member Ted Williams called Feller "the fastest and best pitcher I ever saw during my career." Hall of Famer Stan Musial believed he was "probably the greatest pitcher of our era." He was inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame in 1962 on his first ballot appearance; at the time only three players ever had a higher percentage of ballot votes.

Paul Derringer - Samuel Paul Derringer (October 17, 1906 – November 17, 1987) was a right-handed pitcher in Major League Baseball who played for three National League teams from 1931 to 1945, primarily the Cincinnati Reds. He won 20 games for Cincinnati four times between 1935 and 1940, peaking with a 25–7 season in 1939 as the Reds won the NL pennant for the first time in 20 years. His 161 victories with Cincinnati are the club record for a right-hander, and rank second in franchise history. He also held the team record for career strikeouts when his career ended. His 579 games pitched ranked eighth in NL history when he retired, and his average of 1.88 walks per 9 innings pitched ranked behind only Christy Mathewson (1.59) and Grover Cleveland Alexander (1.65) among pitchers with 3000 innings in the NL since 1900.

Mel Parnell - Melvin Lloyd Parnell (June 13, 1922 – March 20, 2012) was a left-handed starting pitcher. Parnell spent his entire ten-year career with the Boston Red Sox (1947–1956), compiling a 123-75 record with 732 strikeouts, a 3.50 earned run average, 113 complete games, 20 shutouts, and 1752.2 innings pitched in 289 games (232 as a starter). He has the third-highest career winning percentage for a left-hander in Fenway Park (minimum of more than 25 decisions), at 71-30 (.703).

Addie Joss - Adrian "Addie" Joss (April 12, 1880 – April 14, 1911), nicknamed "The Human Hairpin," was an American pitcher in Major League Baseball. He pitched for the Cleveland Bronchos, later known as the Naps, between 1902 and 1910. Joss, who was 6 feet 3 inches (1.91 m) and weighed 185 pounds (84 kg), pitched the fourth perfect game in baseball history (which, additionally, was only the second of the modern era). His 1.89 career earned run average (ERA) is the second-lowest in MLB history, behind Ed Walsh.

Wes Ferrell - Wesley Cheek "Wes" Ferrell (February 2, 1908 – December 9, 1976) was an American professional baseball player. He played in Major League Baseball from 1927 through 1941. Primarily a starting pitcher, Ferrell played for the Cleveland Indians (1927–33), Boston Red Sox (1934–37), Washington Senators (1937–38), New York Yankees (1938–39), Brooklyn Dodgers (1940) and Boston Braves (1941). He batted and threw right-handed. Ferrell's 37 home runs as a batter remain a career record for a MLB pitcher.

Claude Passeau - Claude William Passeau (April 9, 1909 – August 30, 2003) was an American starting pitcher in Major League Baseball. From 1935 through 1947, Passeau played with the Pittsburgh Pirates (1935), Philadelphia Phillies (1936–39) and Chicago Cubs (1939–47). He batted and threw right-handed. In a 13-year career, Passeau posted a 162–150 record with 1104 strikeouts and a 3.32 ERA in 2179​2⁄3 innings.

Smokey Joe Williams - Joseph Williams (April 6, 1886 – February 25, 1951), nicknamed "Cyclone Joe" or "Smokey Joe", was an American right-handed pitcher in the Negro leagues. He is widely recognized as one of the game's greatest pitchers, even though he never played a game in the major leagues. He was elected to the Baseball Hall of Fame in 1999.

Mel Harder - Melvin Leroy Harder (October 15, 1909 – October 20, 2002), nicknamed "Chief", was an American right-handed starting pitcher, coach and manager in Major League Baseball, who played his entire career with the Cleveland Indians. He spent 36 seasons overall with the Indians, as a player from 1928 to 1947 and as one of the game's most highly regarded pitching coaches from 1948 to 1963. He set franchise records for wins (223), games started (433) and innings pitched (3426-1/3) which were later broken by Bob Feller, and still holds the club record of 582 career games pitched; he was among the American League's career leaders in wins (9th), games (8th) and starts (10th) when he retired. He was also an excellent fielder, leading AL pitchers in putouts four times, then a record.

Bucky Walters - William Henry "Bucky" Walters (April 19, 1909 – April 20, 1991) was an American Major League Baseball All-Star pitcher and the 1939 National League MVP. A native of Philadelphia, Walters played for the Boston Braves (1931–32, 1950), Boston Red Sox (1933–1934), Philadelphia Phillies (1934–1938) and Cincinnati Reds (1938–1948). He batted and threw right-handed.

Bill Hallahan - William Anthony Hallahan (August 4, 1902 – July 8, 1981) was an American left-handed pitcher in Major League Baseball during the 1920s and 1930s. Nicknamed "Wild Bill" because of his lack of control on the mound—he twice led the National League in bases on balls—Hallahan nevertheless was one of the pitching stars of the 1931 World Series and pitched his finest in postseason competition. He also was the starting pitcher for the National League in the first All-Star Game in 1933, losing a 4–2 decision to Lefty Gomez of the American League and surrendering a third-inning home run to Babe Ruth in the process.

- - -

I will be working on starting lineups tomorrow, and will post the final roster before games start on Monday.
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Old 05-13-2019, 08:35 AM   #14
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The lineups and Pitching staff are set - the league is formed, and the Memorials are ready to play.

As with any Perfect Team league, "you win or get creamed", and this team will not win. 8 of the 15 teams in the American Conference have rosters noticeably better than Chandler, so a goal of playing .500 is realistic in 2026.

Play Ball !!!
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Old 05-14-2019, 08:49 AM   #15
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Bit of a slow start as the Memorials post an 11-15 start, and are already 9 1/2 games out of first place in the 2026 season.

Walker Cooper (.315) and Dick Bartell (.318) lead the team in offense, and SP Addie Joss is 2-2 with a 2.97 ERA. The bullpen is doing well with Paul Derringer 5 saves 0.00 ERA, Claude Passeau 1-0 with a 0.64 ERA and Mel Harder 0-0 with a 0.90.

It's early, and I'm only shooting for a .500 season, so not much to do at the moment. The hope would be we play .500 and accumulate enough points to make a difference between seasons.
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